Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

She was the recipient of the 2022 Shorenstein Journalism Award for her overall reporting on the Asia Pacific.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018 and won two Human Rights Press awards. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China was recognized by the National Headliners Award. She spearheaded coverage that has won two Gracie Awards. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

A T-shirt, worn at a Berlin rally this month to support European aid to Ukraine, celebrates the Ukrainian soldiers on Snake Island who refused to surrender to Russian naval forces. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainian State Emergency Service firefighters work to take away debris at a shopping center burned after a rocket attack in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, Tuesday. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Russian missiles end weeks of relative quiet across the western half of Ukraine

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New Forced Labor Prevention act goes into effect June 21

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A deadly church shooting exposes the complexities of Taiwanese and Chinese identities

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Younger workers in China are questioning the benefits of the daily grind as they face worsening prospects. The rise of "Sang culture" embodies the frustration and soul-crushing weariness. Sarah Gonzales for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Hard work is a point of pride in China. But a culture of slacking off is now in vogue

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In China, overwork is common and exhaustion is socially acceptable. Those who opt out of the grind are seen as a threat. Sarah Gonzales for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Slackers@Work: A Song for the Exhausted

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So many people are looking to leave China that it's been dubbed the run movement

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The Chinese flag is visible behind razor wire at a housing compound in Yangisar, south of Kashgar, in China's western Xinjiang region. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

How goods made with forced labor end up in your local American store

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2-year investigation reveals ICE has data on most of the American public

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Shkoon's album 'FIRAQ' gets to their roots, fusing Arabic folklore and German techno

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In a remote Chinese region, thousands are coerced to work

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Joe Biden listens to remarks by Finland's President Sauli Niinisto and Sweden's Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson at the White House this week. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Two versions of history collide as Finland and Sweden seek to join NATO

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