Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018, recognized by the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit that May. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China earned her another Human Rights Press Award, was recognized by the National Headliners Award, and won a Gracie Award. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

Hong Kong's 'Apple Daily' Shut Down, Leadership Arrested

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A man buys multiple copies of the latest Apple Daily newspaper in Hong Kong. Police raided the office of Apple Daily, the city's fierce pro-democracy newspaper, in an operation involving more than 200 officers. Secretary for Security John Lee said the company used "news coverage as a tool" to harm national security, according to local media reports. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Hong Kong's Apple Daily To Shut Down This Weekend After Having Its Assets Frozen

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Hong Kong Tabloid Is Beloved By Readers But Bedeviled By Beijing

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The Legacy Of The Lasting Effects Of China's 1-Child Policy

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Apple Daily editor-in-chief Ryan Law is escorted by police to a waiting vehicle outside the entrance of the Apple Daily newspaper offices in Hong Kong on Thursday. ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Police Arrest 'Apple Daily' Editors Under Hong Kong Security Law

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The Xinyuan Coal Mine operated by Yangquan Coal Industry Group Co. in Jinzhong, Shanxi province, in October. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

China Wants To Go Carbon-Neutral — And Won't Stop Burning Coal To Get There

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U.S. and Chinese flags before the opening session of 2019 trade negotiations between U.S. and Chinese trade representatives in Beijing. China just passed a sweeping law designed to counter sanctions the U.S. and the European Union have imposed on Chinese officials and major Chinese companies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

China's New Anti-Foreign Sanctions Law Sends A Chill Through The Business Community

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Chow Hang-tung, the vice chair of The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, speaks to media May 6 outside a court in Hong Kong. Hong Kong police on arrested Chow on Friday. Rafael Wober/AP hide caption

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Rafael Wober/AP

Hong Kong's Tiananmen Square Vigil Is Banned As Authorities Arrest Organizers

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Allowing couples in China to have up to three children rather than two will help the country counteract a population that's shifting towards the elderly, the government says. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

Confronted By Aging Population China Allows Couples To Have 3 Children

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Pro-democracy activists Leung Kwok-hung (center) and Lee Cheuk-yan head to a Hong Kong Correctional Services van Friday before their sentencing hearing. Both received three years in prison for organizing and attending a protest on China's National Day on Oct. 1, 2019. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Billionaire Sun Dawu built an agriculture empire just outside Beijing. Now his conglomerate, Dawu Group, is slipping out of his control. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese Billionaire Arrested And Business Seized By State

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