Emily Feng Emily Feng is an international correspondent for NPR covering China, Taiwan and beyond.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

International Correspondent

Emily Feng is an international correspondent for NPR covering China, Taiwan and beyond.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine, the top of a mosque in Qinghai and inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

She was 2023 winner of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, awarded to a rising public media journalist 35 years of age or younger. She also received the 2022 Shorenstein Journalism Award for her overall reporting on the Asia Pacific.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018 and won two Human Rights Press awards. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China was recognized by the National Headliners Award. She spearheaded coverage that has won two Gracie Awards. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

Saturday

As China looks to stabilize its economy, senior finance officials get the boot

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Thursday

Skepticism grows in Taiwan over whether Washington is a reliable security partner

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Wednesday

The fishers of Penghu see firsthand the tensions between Taiwan and China

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Thursday

A pineapple symbolizes the tense relationship between China and Taiwan

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Wednesday

The alleged theft of the mango pineapple has set into motion a debate across Taiwan on how to counter Chinese economic coercion and political influence. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

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Emily Feng/NPR

Thursday

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They flocked to build China's cities. Now builders are aging with little retirement

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Tuesday

Incoming Guatemalan President Bernardo Arévalo sings his nation's anthem at the start of his swearing-in ceremony in Guatemala City, early Monday, Jan. 15, 2024. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

A Pivotal Election in Taiwan and a Guatemala Inauguration that Almost Didn't Happen

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China's millennial and Gen Z workers are having to lower their economic expectations

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Monday

China has had a muted response to Taiwan's weekend elections

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Saturday

Taiwan elects a new president from the ruling party amid tensions with China

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Lai Ching-te, Taiwan's president-elect (center) appears at an election night rally outside the Democratic Progressive Party headquarters in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday. An Rong Xu/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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An Rong Xu/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Taiwan's China-skeptic ruling-party candidate wins presidential election

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Friday

Taiwan's upcoming election attracts the attention of China, the U.S. and others

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Thursday

Supporters attend a campaign rally for Taiwan's main opposition party, Kuomintang, ahead of this month's presidential election, in Taipei on Dec. 23. I-Hwa Cheng/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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I-Hwa Cheng/AFP via Getty Images

Taiwan deals with lots of misinformation, and it's harder to track down

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Tuesday

Supporters gather to support KMT presidential candidate Hou Yu-ih outside of a local temple in Taipei on January 9, 2024. I-HWA CHENG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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I-HWA CHENG/AFP via Getty Images

China's Influence on Taiwan's Politics and Taiwan's Influence on Chinese Pop Culture

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There's tension between China and Taiwan but that's not the case with their music

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A television set, displaying news regarding a "presidential alert" message issued by the authorities to all phones in Taiwan, is seen in a hypermarket in Taipei on Jan. 9, 2024. SAM YEH/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAM YEH/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

How Taiwanese identity has evolved on the island in recent generations

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Saturday

A preview of the Taiwan presidential election

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Wednesday

Chinese Storytellers Find Freedom in New York City

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Tuesday

House bill aims to restart controversial DOJ program that targeted Chinese academics

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Friday

Misinformation is becoming more sophisticated in Taiwan

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Thursday

As China's migrant workforce ages, how will the country support them?

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Tuesday

How young adults in China feel about their dimming economic prospects

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Monday

COVID hurt Beijing's economy — but for some, this has been an opportunity

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