Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in February 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

From 2017 through 2019, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights, technology, and the environment. While in this position, Feng made four trips to Xinjiang under difficult reporting circumstances. During these trips, Feng reported extensively on China's detention and surveillance campaign in the western region of Xinjiang, was the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uighur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and uncovered that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, trek out to coal towns and steel mills, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art.

Prior to her work with the Financial Times, Feng freelanced in Beijing, covering arts, culture, and business for such outlets as The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and The Economist.

For her coverage of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, Feng was shortlisted for the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit award for breaking news coverage that May. Feng also earned two spots on the October 2018 British Journalism Awards shortlists: Best Foreign Coverage for her work covering Xinjiang, and Young Journalist of the Year for overall reporting excellence.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

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Story Archive

South China Sea Once Again Becomes A Dangerous Military Flashpoint

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Uighur Family Spends More Than A Year Imprisoned In Own Home In China

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China Bans U.S. Lawmakers From Entering The Country

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Students walk past the central main building on campus at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Police Monday detained a prominent legal scholar at the university who has been critical of the Communist Party and President Xi Jinping. Mike Kemp/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Corbis via Getty Images

1st Arrests Made After China Enacts Hong Kong Security Law

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A man displays the Hong Kong colonial flag Wednesday, the anniversary of the city's handover to China from Britain in 1997. The gesture could be prosecuted under Beijing's new national security law, which it imposed on Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Hong Kong Residents Reflect On The Future On Anniversary Of End Of British Rule

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Pro-mainland supporters in Hong Kong hold Chinese and Hong Kong flags during a rally to celebrate the approval of a national security law on Tuesday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

China Enacts Security Law, Asserting Control Over Hong Kong

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People hold banners at a demonstration in support of Jasic Technology factory workers, outside Yanziling police station in Pingshan district, Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, on Aug. 6, 2018. Sue-Lin Wong/Reuters hide caption

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Sue-Lin Wong/Reuters

Liu Ping, a breeder of bamboo rats. He had to cull his rats when the Chinese government banned consumption of various wild animals as a way to potentially curb spread of viruses from animals to humans. Liu Ping hide caption

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Liu Ping

A resident walks across an empty track on Feb. 7 in Wuhan, China. Wuhan residents lived through the start of the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives around the world. Getty Images hide caption

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A Cluster Of Coronavirus Cases In Beijing Is Traced Back To A Produce Market

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India And China See Most Violent Clash In Decades At Himalayan Border

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Lockdowns Ordered As COVID-19 Cluster Found Near Beijing Food Market

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Paramilitary police officers wear face masks and goggles as they stand guard at an entrance to the closed Xinfadi market in Beijing on Saturday. Greg Baker /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker /AFP via Getty Images