Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in February 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

From 2017 through 2019, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights, technology, and the environment. While in this position, Feng made four trips to Xinjiang under difficult reporting circumstances. During these trips, Feng reported extensively on China's detention and surveillance campaign in the western region of Xinjiang, was the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uighur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and uncovered that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, trek out to coal towns and steel mills, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art.

Prior to her work with the Financial Times, Feng freelanced in Beijing, covering arts, culture, and business for such outlets as The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and The Economist.

For her coverage of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, Feng was shortlisted for the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit award for breaking news coverage that May. Feng also earned two spots on the October 2018 British Journalism Awards shortlists: Best Foreign Coverage for her work covering Xinjiang, and Young Journalist of the Year for overall reporting excellence.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

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University administrators say the FBI, whose headquarters are shown above, has urged them to monitor some Chinese students and scholars. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

FBI Urges Universities To Monitor Some Chinese Students And Scholars In The U.S.

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Railroad Workers' Descendants Notice Lack Of Credit For Chinese Immigrants

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Huawei Accused Of Technology Theft

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Left: Russell Low's relative emigrated from China to work on the Transcontinental Railroad in the U.S. Right: Teng Biao, a civil rights lawyer, fled China in 2014 after he became targeted by the Chinese government for challenging the constitutionality of certain laws. Terray Sylvester/Reuters and May Tse/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Terray Sylvester/Reuters and May Tse/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Chinese Students Are Under Suspicion In China And The U.S.

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A technician works in a lab at GeseDNA Technology in Beijing. To counter China, the U.S. plans to impose new export restrictions on "emerging and foundational technology" that researchers say could affect the way they share genetic materials with international labs. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Stopping Key Tech Exports To China Could Backfire, Researchers And Firms Say

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This year, the U.S. canceled visas for Chinese government-linked scholars over concerns that such exchanges are conduits for peddling influence and for espionage. Increased scrutiny has delayed visas to hundreds of Chinese students. Meanwhile, American academics are having difficulty receiving visas to China. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

Visas Are The Newest Weapon In U.S.-China Rivalry

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Created by Chinese programmers, 996.ICU has become a popular repository of workers' rights campaign materials on the website GitHub. The name is a play on a refrain that long work hours of 9 to 9, six days a week, could send tech workers to the intensive care unit. 996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR

GitHub Has Become A Haven For China's Censored Internet Users

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A Chinese site engineer is seen during construction of an extension of the Southern Expressway in Sri Lanka, in November. The project is part of Beijing's massive Belt and Road Initiative. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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A scene from the elevator's security video, which shows the assailant repeatedly hitting the woman after she says she had asked him to stop smoking. People's Daily of China via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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People's Daily of China via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Ye Haiyan is the activist known as "Hooligan Sparrow" — and the subject of a new documentary about her efforts to gain justice for six schoolgirls who'd allegedly been sexually assaulted by their principal. Courtesy of Hooligan Sparrow hide caption

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Courtesy of Hooligan Sparrow