Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

She was the recipient of the 2022 Shorenstein Journalism Award for her overall reporting on the Asia Pacific.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018 and won two Human Rights Press awards. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China was recognized by the National Headliners Award. She spearheaded coverage that has won two Gracie Awards. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

China ends series of live fire military drills around the island of Taiwan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1116389423/1116390158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The fallout continues from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1116036111/1116036112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese soldiers wearing masks guard the entrance to the military museum in Beijing on Aug. 1. China says military exercises by its navy, air force and other departments are underway in six zones surrounding Taiwan. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP

President Bill Clinton holds up his hands indicating no more questions as he and Chinese President Jiang Zemin hold a joint press conference in 1997 in Washington, D.C. Clinton confirmed that he agreed to lift a ban on the export of nuclear power technology to China. Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images

What 3 past Taiwan Strait crises can teach us about U.S.-China tensions today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115234980/1115347224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

US Kills al-Qaida Leader In Drone Strike; Pelosi Visits Taiwan, Rankling China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115229865/1115239758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nancy Pelosi has landed in Taiwan, despite warnings from Beijing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115266997/1115266998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo released by the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi walks with Taiwan's Foreign Minister Joseph Wu as she arrives in Taipei, Taiwan, on Tuesday, despite threats from Beijing of serious consequences, becoming the highest-ranking American official to visit the self-ruled island claimed by China in 25 years. Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs via AP

Pelosi has landed in Taiwan. Here's why that's a big deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114852740/1115301306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Frontline fighter Oleg, 21 years old and a new military academy graduate, talks about the Russian invasion near Dnipro, Ukraine, on July 7. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carol Guzy for NPR

As Ukraine's war grinds on, soldiers are outgunned and injuries are rising

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112113033/1112116313" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Inna Kravchenko, 52, and her mother, Raïsa Kozlova, 75, moments after crossing by bike from Russian-occupied territory in the Kherson region to the Ukrainian-controlled village of Zelenodolsk. They were able to bring three bags of belongings but fear their house they left behind will be destroyed by Russian soldiers. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Feng/NPR

Ukrainian villagers flee Russian-occupied Kherson on foot, bike and wheelchair

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111022553/1111912976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chechen soldiers join Ukraine's fight against Russia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111771255/1111771256" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hardened by 8 years of war, many Ukrainians are staying put

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110698776/1110698777" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zelenskyy has consolidated Ukraine's TV outlets and dissolved rival political parties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110577439/1110632949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russia has control of a key eastern Ukrainian city

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109737273/1109737542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A T-shirt, worn at a Berlin rally this month to support European aid to Ukraine, celebrates the Ukrainian soldiers on Snake Island who refused to surrender to Russian naval forces. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Ukrainian State Emergency Service firefighters work to take away debris at a shopping center burned after a rocket attack in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, Tuesday. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Efrem Lukatsky/AP