Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018, recognized by the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit that May. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China earned her another Human Rights Press Award, was recognized by the National Headliners Award, and won a Gracie Award. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

Zhou Xiaoxuan speaks to journalists and supporters on Sept. 14 outside the Haidian District People's Court in Beijing before a hearing in her case. She alleged that she was groped and forcibly kissed by prominent TV anchor Zhu Jun, who denies the allegations and has countersued for defamation. The court ruled there was not sufficient evidence of sexual harassment. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Court Ruling Deals A Blow To China's Faltering #MeToo Movement

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The White House said that President Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed on Thursday "to engage on both sets of issues openly and straightforwardly." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden And Xi Jinping Speak For The 1st Time In Months Amid Fraying U.S.-China Ties

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Students and parents walk after a private after-school session in Beijing's Haidian district, where competition is cutthroat for a spot in top schools. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Forget Tiger Moms. Now China's 'Chicken Blood' Parents Are Pushing Kids To Succeed

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They Fled China Decades Ago. Now, They Must Flee The Taliban In Afghanistan

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A community worker delivered daily necessities to a household in Ruili City in China's Yunnan Province during a July lockdown triggered by COVID cases. Ruili closed off its city proper and asked all residents to quarantine at home. Classes were suspended. Most establishments were closed with the exception of markets, hospitals and pharmacies. Restaurants could only offer takeout food. Wang Guansen/Xinhua /Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Guansen/Xinhua /Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Beijing's Subway System Offers History At Each Stop, Both Above And Below Ground

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Can China's Zero Tolerance Approach To Fighting The Delta Variant Work Forever?

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Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets with Afghan Taliban leader Abdul Ghani Baradar in Tianjin, China, on July 28. Li Ran/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Li Ran/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Here's What A Taliban-Controlled Afghanistan May Mean For China

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The Taliban Takeover In Afghanistan Draws A Mixed Global Response

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Alibaba's headquarters in Hangzhou, China. A female employee at the tech company is alleging that she was sexually assaulted by her manager. Long Wei/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Long Wei/VCG via Getty Images

In this file image made from a March 2, 2017, video, Michael Spavor, director of Paektu Cultural Exchange, talks during a Skype interview in Yanji, China. The Intermediate People's Court of Dandong City, a Chinese border city near North Korea, sentenced Spavor on Wednesday, saying he illegally provided state secrets to overseas contacts. AP Photo/File hide caption

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AP Photo/File

China's Aim To Reverse A Declining Birth Rate May Increase Job Discrimination

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Coronavirus Outbreaks Across China Are Causing Lockdowns And Travel Controls

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In Wuhan, China, residents wait in line for coronavirus testing on Tuesday. The city is testing its entire population after the discovery of eight cases in the city. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images