Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in February 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

From 2017 through 2019, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights, technology, and the environment. While in this position, Feng made four trips to Xinjiang under difficult reporting circumstances. During these trips, Feng reported extensively on China's detention and surveillance campaign in the western region of Xinjiang, was the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uighur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and uncovered that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, trek out to coal towns and steel mills, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art.

Prior to her work with the Financial Times, Feng freelanced in Beijing, covering arts, culture, and business for such outlets as The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and The Economist.

For her coverage of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, Feng was shortlisted for the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit award for breaking news coverage that May. Feng also earned two spots on the October 2018 British Journalism Awards shortlists: Best Foreign Coverage for her work covering Xinjiang, and Young Journalist of the Year for overall reporting excellence.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

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Lawyer Ren Quanniu (center), representing Chinese citizen journalist Zhang Zhan who reported on Wuhan's COVID-19 outbreak and was placed in detention since May, arrives at the Shanghai Pudong New District People's Court where Zhang is set for trial in Shanghai on Dec. 28. Ren has since been disbarred. Leo Ramirez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Ben Embarek speaks during a news conference to wrap up a visit by an international team of experts from the World Health Organization in the city of Wuhan, China, on Tuesday. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

WHO: 'Very Unlikely' Coronavirus Leaked From Lab, More Study Needed To Trace Source

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WHO Probe Into Origin Of COVID-19 Raises More Questions Than Answers

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A portrait of the late Dr. Li Wenliang at his hospital in Wuhan, China. Li was a whistleblower in the early days of the country's coronavirus pandemic and died of COVID-19 on Feb. 7, 2020. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

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Dear Dr. Li: Chinese Netizens Confess To The Late Coronavirus Whistleblower

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COVID-19 Restrictions Force Many To Cancel Lunar New Year Travel Plans

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Scandals In China Bring Calls For More Regulation Over Tech Companies

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Inside The World Health Organization's Investigation Into How Pandemic Began

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Chinese workers wait to receive a COVID-19 vaccine jab at a mass vaccination center in Beijing on Jan. 5. Even with at least 5 homegrown vaccines nearing approval, China is setting a modest initial goal: 50 million people vaccinated by mid-February — about 3.5% of the total population. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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China's Vaccine Campaign Hits A Few Bumps

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Residents Protest As China Demolishes Some Of Beijing's Wealthy Suburbs

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Life In Wuhan, 1 Year After The COVID-19 Outbreak Began

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A woman walks in a park along Yangtze River in Wuhan on Jan. 19, 2021. Residents of the city of 11 million, which was the first epicenter of COVID-19, have conflicting emotions as they reckon with the aftermath of the virus and their 76-day lockdown. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wuhan's Lockdown Memories 1 Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain

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U.S. Allies React To Breach Of U.S. Capitol By Pro-Trump Extremists

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John Clancey, a U.S. attorney who is known for taking on human rights cases, is led away Wednesday by police after his arrest in Hong Kong under a new Beijing-imposed national security law. Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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In Dramatic Sweep, Police In Hong Kong Arrest Dozens Of Opposition Figures

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