Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018, recognized by the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit that May. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China earned her another Human Rights Press Award, was recognized by the National Headliners Award, and won a Gracie Award. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

Hong Kong authorities shut down the region's last independent news outlets

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In the main Olympic media center, a promotional image anticipates the Beijing Games. Throughout the Olympic venues, organizers anticipate the threat of COVID-19. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

China's Olympics aim to keep COVID at bay with armpit sensors, robots and more

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To keep Olympics COVID-free, China creates invisible bubbles around facilities

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Above: locals in Liuzhou feast on their regional specialty of snail noodles. The novelty of the dish has made it a viral sensation in China during the pandemic. Li Hanchi/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Li Hanchi/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Snail noodles go viral in China during the pandemic. But the dish is a bit ... funky

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Why the Chinese government wants more feel-good stories posted online

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A closed mill in Beijing no longer makes steel but it has purpose in the Olympics

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Women wearing face masks to protect against COVID-19 look at their smartphones at a public park in Beijing Wednesday. China is reporting a major drop in local COVID-19 infections in the northern city of Xi'an, which has been under a tight lockdown for the past two weeks. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Residents of Xi'an, China, react to COVID lockdowns with outrage and humor

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China excels at the Paralympics, but its disabled citizens are fighting for access

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Beijing cracks down on cities' land-selling model. Nanning feels the effects first

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Most hospitals in China only offer reproductive services to married women

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Amid Taiwan spat, Lithuania closes embassy in China after diplomats leave

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) with Premier Li Keqiang (left) and members of the Politburo Standing Committee at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on the eve of China's National Day on Sept. 30. Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Not invited to Biden's democracy summit, China launches a propaganda blitz

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