Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts and digital platforms.

Previously, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights and technology. She also began extensively reporting on the region of Xinjiang during this period, becoming the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uyghur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and discovering that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, travel to environmental wastelands and write about girl bands and art. She's filed stories from the bottom of a coal mine; the top of a mosque in Qinghai; and from inside a cave Chairman Mao once lived in.

She was the recipient of the 2022 Shorenstein Journalism Award for her overall reporting on the Asia Pacific.

Her human rights coverage has been shortlisted by the British Journalism Awards in 2018 and won two Human Rights Press awards. Her radio coverage of the coronavirus epidemic in China was recognized by the National Headliners Award. She spearheaded coverage that has won two Gracie Awards. She was also named a Livingston Award finalist in 2021.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

Story Archive

Chinese President Jiang Zemin sings a selection from "Beijing Opera" on the last day of an eight-day visit to the U.S. on Nov. 2, 1997, in Los Angeles. Hector Mata/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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China's ex-leader Jiang Zemin, an influential reformer, has died at 96

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Protesters explain why they demonstrated in China

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China is quietly cracking down on mass protests that broke out over the weekend

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Chinese protesters demand an end to COVID restrictions and Communist rule

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People across China are protesting for democratic reform and easing COVID controls

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Protesters march in Beijing at a rally for the victims of a deadly fire as well as a protest against China's harsh COVID-19 restrictions early Monday. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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How a deadly fire in Xinjiang prompted protests unseen in China in three decades

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After brief respite, China re-imposes strict COVID restrictions as infections rise

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Workers wear protective gear in a Beijing neighborhood placed under lockdown in November. China had raised hopes by slightly relaxing its zero-COVID policy, but cities have been contending with a surge in cases. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A Russian-made missile explodes in Poland — killing 2 people

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Biden backs investigation into origins of missile that struck Poland

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World leaders discuss high food and energy costs at the G20 summit

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President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping hold a meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Bali on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Biden and China's President Xi Jinping shake hands as they begin talks in Bali. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Biden and China's Xi met for three hours. Here's what they talked about

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Ahead of meeting between Biden and China's Xi Jinping, expectations are low

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After decades focused on the Middle East, the U.S. military shifts to the Pacific

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