Emily Feng Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Emily Feng

Allison Shelley/NPR
Emily Feng at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Emily Feng

Correspondent, Beijing

Emily Feng is NPR's Beijing correspondent.

Feng joined NPR in February 2019. She roves around China, through its big cities and small villages, reporting on social trends as well as economic and political news coming out of Beijing. Feng contributes to NPR's newsmagazines, newscasts, podcasts, and digital platforms.

From 2017 through 2019, Feng served as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times. Based in Beijing, she covered a broad range of topics, including human rights, technology, and the environment. While in this position, Feng made four trips to Xinjiang under difficult reporting circumstances. During these trips, Feng reported extensively on China's detention and surveillance campaign in the western region of Xinjiang, was the first foreign reporter to uncover that China was separating Uighur children from their parents and sending them to state-run orphanages, and uncovered that China was introducing forced labor in Xinjiang's detention camps.

Feng's reporting has also let her nerd out over semiconductors and drones, trek out to coal towns and steel mills, travel to environmental wastelands, and write about girl bands and art.

Prior to her work with the Financial Times, Feng freelanced in Beijing, covering arts, culture, and business for such outlets as The New York Times, Foreign Policy, and The Economist.

For her coverage of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, Feng was shortlisted for the Amnesty Media Awards in February 2019 and won a Human Rights Press merit award for breaking news coverage that May. Feng also earned two spots on the October 2018 British Journalism Awards shortlists: Best Foreign Coverage for her work covering Xinjiang, and Young Journalist of the Year for overall reporting excellence.

Feng graduated cum laude from Duke University with a dual B.A. degree from Duke's Sanford School in Asian and Middle Eastern studies and in public policy.

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An ethnic Hui Muslim man stands in front of Laohuasi Mosque in Linxia, Gansu province, in 2018. Chinese Muslims are most densely clustered in the northwestern regions of Gansu, Ningxia and Xinjiang, but live across the country, as they have for more than a millennium. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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China Targets Muslim Scholars And Writers With Increasingly Harsh Restrictions

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'We Are Shipping To The U.S.': Inside China's Online Synthetic Drug Networks

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Ant's IPO Woes

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A staff member checks vaccines at a Beijing factory built by Sinovac to produce a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine. Sinovac is one of 11 Chinese companies approved to carry out clinical trials of potential vaccines. Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images

China Is Inoculating Thousands With Unapproved COVID-19 Vaccines. Why?

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Much recent international media attention has been focused on the U.S. presidential elections, like this live news report showing on an outdoor screen in Hong Kong. Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

All Eyes On US

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China Treats People Deemed Vulnerable With Experimental Coronavirus Vaccine

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Pro-democracy lawmakers at the start of a news conference in a Legislative Council office in Hong Kong on Wednesday. The legislators are resigning en masse over a new law from Beijing that led to the ouster of four of their fellow lawmakers. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Latest Beijing Resolution Cracks Down On Hong Kong Legislators

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What Might Biden's Presidency Mean For U.S. Foreign Policy?

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People visit a showroom of the mobile payment powerhouse, Ant Financial, in China in 2018. Ant Financial, a spinoff from the Alibaba Group, was set to raise $37 billion in an IPO that regulators abruptly halted. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The Yiwu wholesale market in Yiwu, China, supplies U.S. political campaigns with much of their swag: caps, flags and T-shirts. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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An Anxious China Awaits Result Of U.S. Presidential Race

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China's Xinjiang Region On Lockdown Amid Report Of New Cluster Of Coronavirus Cases

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China Aims To Be More Resilient To External Economic Shocks

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