Ramtin Arablouei Ramtin Arablouei is co-host and co-producer of NPR's podcast Throughline.
Ramtin Arablouei, co-host and co-producer of Throughline.
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Ramtin Arablouei

Mike Morgan/NPR
Ramtin Arablouei, co-host and co-producer of Throughline.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Ramtin Arablouei

Host/Producer, Throughline

Ramtin Arablouei is co-host and co-producer of NPR's podcast Throughline, a show that explores history through creative, immersive storytelling designed to reintroduce history to new audiences.

Arablouei got his start at NPR in 2015 with a three-week contract to produce a pilot for How I Built This with Guy Raz, and now produces, reports, mixes, and writes music for such top-rated podcasts as TED Radio Hour, Hidden Brain, Embedded, Invisibilia, The Indicator, Code Switch, Radio Ambulante, and the Center for Investigative Reporting's Reveal.

A trained audio engineer, Arablouei spent most of his early twenties in recording studios. He contributed sound design and music for films and commercials, including the IMAX trailer for 300: Rise of an Empire. He's written music for many award-winning podcasts including "Los Cassettes del Exilio" (Radio Ambulante) and the "All Work. No Pay" episode of Reveal, which won the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi award for investigative reporting.

Born in Iran, Arablouei emigrated to the U.S. with his family as a child. He graduated from St. Mary's College of Maryland with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology and history.

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The Historical Perspective Behind The Latest Israel-Hamas Conflict

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Who The Uyghurs Are And Why China Is Targeting Them

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Smoke and flames rise after Israeli fighter jets' airstrike hit an area in Khan Yunis, Gaza on May 13, 2021. Abed Rahim Khatib/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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An anti-government protester is carried on shoulders before a speech by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square February 10, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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A Uyghur woman protests the detainment of Uyghur citizens following ethnic unrest in the Xinjiang region, China. Guang Niu/Getty Images hide caption

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James Baldwin poses while at home in Saint Paul de Vence, South of France during September of 1985. Ulf Andersen/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR Podcast 'Throughline' Examines The Real Black Panthers

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Earth Day on April 20, 1970 in New York, New York. Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

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The Black Panthers march in protest of the trial of co-founder Huey P. Newton in Oakland, California. Bettmann/Getty hide caption

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'Throughline': Why Tipping In The U.S. Took Off After The Civil War

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Yuri Kochiyama speaks at an anti-war demonstration in New York City's Central Park around 1968. Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center hide caption

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Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center