Carmel Wroth
Carmel Wroth, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Carmel Wroth

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President Biden delivers his State of the Union address on March 1. Among other issues, Biden spoke about his administration's plans to address mental health care in the United States. Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images

Here's what experts say Biden gets right in his new mental health plan

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NPR

CDC says Americans can now go unmasked in many parts of the country

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Don't let omicron crash your holiday gathering. Here's how to keep your family safe

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A registered nurse stirs a nasal swab in testing solution after administering a COVID-19 test in Los Angeles, Calif. Increased testing could help in efforts to detect and track new variants like omicron. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for young children is a lower-dose formulation of the companies' adult vaccine. It was found to be safe and nearly 91% effective at preventing COVID-19. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

COVID-19 survivors gather in New York and place stickers representing lost relatives on a wall in remembrance of those who have died during the pandemic. Stefan Jeremiah/AP hide caption

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Stefan Jeremiah/AP

COVID deaths leave thousands of U.S. kids grieving parents or primary caregivers

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The U.S. is preparing for COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, though exactly who needs one is not entirely clear. Emily Elconin/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Getty Images

The pandemic appears to have peaked or be on the verge of peaking, with cases projected to slowly decline this fall and winter. As recently as Sept. 8, people were waiting at COVID-19 testing site in Kentucky, where over 4,000 new cases were confirmed that day. Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Is The Worst Over? Models Predict A Steady Decline In COVID Cases Through March

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Federal health officials are planning ahead to give booster shots in the fall to all U.S. adults, starting with those who were vaccinated early on, like the elderly, health care workers and first responders. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Having a compromised immune system puts you at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. Studies show that the initial vaccine doses are less effective for people with weakened immune systems. A third shot can boost protection. Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Christiana Botic/Boston Globe via Getty Images

People enjoy an outdoor art exhibition in downtown Los Angeles in early July. Los Angeles County public health authorities are now urging unvaccinated and vaccinated people alike to wear face coverings in public indoor spaces because of the growing threat posed by the more contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images
Duy Nguyen/NPR

Where Are The Newest COVID Hot Spots? Mostly Places With Low Vaccination Rates

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