Daniella Cheslow
Stories By

Daniella Cheslow

Story Archive

Boeing Officials Say Company Is Taking Financial Hit From Grounding Of 737 Max Jets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716872964/716872976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713483867/713799022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line on March 27, in Renton, Wash. Boeing is slowing production of its grounded Max airliner while it works on fixing flight-control software in the wake of fatal crashes. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709487222/709998497" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amid Anxiety Surrounding Boeing's 737 Max Jets, One Airline Wants To Cancel Its Order

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/708405597/708405598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With Planes Grounded, Boeing Considers Its Next Steps

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/704039078/704039079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wells Fargo CEO Timothy Sloan faced hours of questioning Tuesday from both Republicans and Democrats on the House Financial Services Committee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Ads promise cash in the form of payday loans at an Advance America storefront in Springfield, Va. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is seeking to rescind a proposed rule to safeguard borrowers from payday lenders. Daniella Cheslow/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniella Cheslow/NPR

Move To Pull Consumer Protection Rule Heightens Debate Over Payday Lending

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700740998/700998434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Venmo is used to pay or request money from other people on the app. Every transaction has a memo line, and the app suggests emoji instead of words like "rent," "pizza," and "wine." Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Alfiky/NPR

As Payments Go Social With Venmo, They're Changing Personal Relationships

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697090168/697839214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Taxpayers faced with smaller refunds or higher taxes have been airing their grievances online. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Anger, Confusion Over Dwindling Refunds. Is Trump's Tax Plan To Blame?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693976808/695054876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript