Daniella Cheslow
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Daniella Cheslow

Jim McIngvale, also known as Mattress Mack, opened his two furniture stores in Houston to serve as temporary shelters. He invited people to come via a Facebook Live video and gave out his personal cell number. Jim McIngvale/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Jim McIngvale/Screenshot by NPR

Stores Full Of Furniture, 'Mattress Mack' Opens His Doors To Flood Victims

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Last year, China banned the sale of commercial elephant ivory to stop poaching. That's when interest in ancient, buried woolly mammoth tusks boomed. Amos Chapple/RFE/RL hide caption

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Amos Chapple/RFE/RL

Woolly Mammoths Are Long Gone, But The Hunt For Their Ivory Tusks Lives On

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An Israeli soldier eats a piece of watermelon near Israel's border with the Gaza Strip in 2014. As more Israelis go vegan, the country's military has made dietary and clothing accommodations for soldiers. Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images

Kobi Tzafrir serves hummus at the Humus Bar, his restaurant north of Tel Aviv, Israel. "If you eat a good hummus, you will feel love from the person who made it," he tells The Salt. "You don't want to stab him." Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

Winemaker Iago Bitarishvili makes wine in clay vessels called qvevri, which he buries underground and fills with white grapes. There are no barrels, vats or monitoring systems for this ancient Georgian method, which is helping drive sales. Bitarishvili plans to bury these new qvevri in his cellar to expand production. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In a village outside of Jenin, in the West Bank, Palestinian farmers harvest wheat early and burn the husks to yield the smoky, nutty grain known as freekeh. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In Jerusalem, Syrian Orthodox Christian Nadia Ishaq prepares her burbara porridge with boiled what kernels, raisins, dried plums and dried apricots, topped with ground coconut in the shape of a cross. The holiday honors St. Barbara, an early convert to Christianity whose story is echoed in the Rapunzel tale. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR