Hannah Allam Hannah Allam is a Washington-based national security correspondent for NPR, focusing on homegrown extremism.
Hannah Allam
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Hannah Allam

Shatha Alawsy/NPR
Hannah Allam
Shatha Alawsy/NPR

Hannah Allam

National Security Correspondent

Hannah Allam is a Washington-based national security correspondent for NPR, focusing on homegrown extremism. Before joining NPR, she was a national correspondent at BuzzFeed News, covering U.S. Muslims and other issues of race, religion and culture. Allam previously reported for McClatchy, spending a decade overseas as bureau chief in Baghdad during the Iraq war and in Cairo during the Arab Spring rebellions. She moved to Washington in 2012 to cover foreign policy, then in 2015 began a yearlong series documenting rising hostility toward Islam in America. Her coverage of Islam in the United States won three national religion reporting awards in 2018 and 2019. Allam was part of McClatchy teams that won an Overseas Press Club award for exposing death squads in Iraq and a Polk Award for reporting on the Syrian conflict. She was a 2009 Nieman fellow at Harvard and currently serves on the board of the International Women's Media Foundation.

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Mike Signer, mayor of Charlottesville at the time, checks his phone while waiting to speak days after Heather Heyer was killed during the Unite the Right rally in 2017. These days Signer travels the country presenting his city's experience as a cautionary tale. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

El Paso Mass Shooting Meant To Galvanize Other White Nationalists

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How Old Racist Books, Artifacts Are Influencing White Nationalists Of The Digital Age

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President Trump Blames Recent Mass Shootings On Mental Health, Video Games, Internet

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Authorities Have Few Tools To Fight Far-Right Extremism Online

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In Aftermath Of El Paso Shooting, Police Investigate Potential Manifesto

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A unique gaming exercise allows girls to be generals for a day as part of an effort to boost women's participation in national security. Here, Stacie Pettyjohn, a political scientist and war-game designer at the RAND Corporation, talks to players about strategy. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Can This Group Of Teen Girls Save The World From Nuclear War?

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Girl Security Brings War Games To A Younger Generation

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Trump Welcomes Conservative, Far-Right Social Media Personalities To The White House

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Maggie Feldman-Piltch, left, founder of #NatSecGirlSquad, and Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in 2017 at the Aspen Security Forum, in Aspen, Colo. Photo courtesy Maggie Feldman-Piltch hide caption

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Photo courtesy Maggie Feldman-Piltch

Women In National Security

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A group from the Proud Boys confronts anti-Trump protesters outside Trump's 2020 campaign kickoff rally Tuesday in Orlando, Fla. The Proud Boys group is known for white nationalist and other extremist rhetoric. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

National Security Officials Debate What To Call The Far-Right Threat

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