Darian Woods Darian Woods is a host of The Indicator from Planet Money.
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Darian Woods

Pallavi Sen/Courtesy of Darian Woods
Darian Woods headshot
Pallavi Sen/Courtesy of Darian Woods

Darian Woods

Host, The Indicator from Planet Money

Darian Woods is a host of The Indicator from Planet Money. He blends economics, journalism, and an ear for audio to tell stories that explain the global economy. He's reported on the time the world got together and solved a climate crisis, vaccine intellectual property explained through cake baking, and how Kit Kat bars reveal hidden economic forces.

Before NPR, Woods worked as an adviser to the Secretary of the New Zealand Treasury. He has an honors degree in economics from the University of Canterbury and a Master of Public Policy from UC Berkeley.

Story Archive

Friday

'Planet Money' explores the specialized workforce in Britain known as working royals

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Thursday

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Tuesday

Attendees visit booths at the RePlatform conference in Las Vegas in March. The conference crowd was a hybrid of anti-vaccine activists, supporters of former President Donald Trump and Christian conservatives. Krystal Ramirez for NPR hide caption

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Krystal Ramirez for NPR

Monday

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Why is insurance so expensive right now? And more listener questions

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Friday

Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Subway

What Subway's foot-long cookie says about inflation

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Thursday

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Wednesday

EU Commission's Margrethe Vestager speaking to the media in Brussels in March 2024. On Tuesday April 9th she announced an investigation into Chinese wind turbine subsidies. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images Europe hide caption

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Thierry Monasse/Getty Images Europe

Tuesday

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Monday

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Wednesday

Technician Konnor Therriault inside of a Vestas wind turbine in Bingham, Maine. Darian Woods/NPR hide caption

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Darian Woods/NPR

Wind boom, wind bust (Two Windicators)

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Monday

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Friday

Reporter Darian Woods and wind turbine technician Konnor Therriault at the base of a Vestas wind turbine in Bingham, Maine. (Photo by Matthew Copeman) Matthew Copeman/Matthew Copeman hide caption

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Matthew Copeman/Matthew Copeman

Why wind techs are so in demand

The job that's projected to be the fastest-growing in the U.S. is wind turbine service technician. So we wanted to learn what they actually do. Today on the show, reporter Darian Woods travels to a windy corner of Maine for a day in the life of one of these green-collar jobs.

Why wind techs are so in demand

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Thursday

Two Ukrainian citizens hold up posters against Russia's military intervention. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

Monday

Recompose

Friday

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An update to a federal law meant to stop racist lending practices faces a lawsuit

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Thursday

The Israeli Minister of Finance reacts to the financial ratings agency Moody's decision to downgrade Israel's credit rating in March 2023. Maya Alerruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alerruzzo/AP

Wednesday

A farmer works at an avocado plantation at the Los Cerritos avocado group ranch in Ciudad Guzman, state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

According to the United Nations, about ten percent of the world is undernourished. It's a daunting statistic — unless your name is Hannah Ritchie. She's the data scientist behind the new book Not the End of the World: How We Can Be the First Generation to Build a Sustainable Planet. It's a seriously big thought experiment: How do we feed everyone on Earth sustainably? And because it's just as much an economically pressing question as it is a scientific one, Darian Woods of The Indicator from Planet Money joins us. With Hannah's help, Darian unpacks how to meet the needs of billions of people without destroying the planet.

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

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Tuesday

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How to make an ad memorable

Super Bowl ads this year relied heavily on nostalgia and surprise –– a few tricks that turn out to embed information into our brains. Today, neuroscientist Charan Ranganath joins the show to dissect the world of marketing to its biological fundamentals and reveal advertisers' bag of tricks.

How to make an ad memorable

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Friday

For lease sign in Los Angeles. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

How one tech startup aims to disrupt the market for illegal rhino horns

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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