Greg Rosalsky Since 2018, Greg Rosalsky has been a writer and reporter at NPR's Planet Money.
Greg Rosalsky, photographed for NPR, 2 August 2022, in New York, NY. Photo by Mamadi Doumbouya for NPR.
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Greg Rosalsky

Mamadi Doumbouya/NPR
Greg Rosalsky, photographed for NPR, 2 August 2022, in New York, NY. Photo by Mamadi Doumbouya for NPR.
Mamadi Doumbouya/NPR

Greg Rosalsky

Reporter, Planet Money

Since 2018, Greg Rosalsky has been a writer and reporter at NPR's Planet Money.

Before joining NPR, he spent more than five years at Freakonomics Radio, where he produced 60 episodes that were downloaded nearly 100 million times. Those included an exposé of the damage filmmaking subsidies have on American visual-effects workers, a deep dive into the successes and failures of Germany's manufacturing model, and a primer on behavioral economics, which he wrote as a satire of traditional economic thought. Among the show's most popular episodes were those he produced about personal finance, including one on why it's a bad idea for people to pick and choose stocks.

Rosalsky has written freelance articles for a number of publications, including The Behavioral Scientist and Pacific Standard. An article he authored about food inequality in New York City was anthologized in Best Food Writing 2017.

Rosalsky began his career in the plains of Iowa working for an underdog presidential candidate named Barack Obama and was a White House researcher during the early years of the Obama Administration.

He earned a master's degree at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, where he studied economics and public policy.

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(LtoR) China's President Xi Jinping and India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi attend a session meeting during the 10th BRICS summit (acronym for the grouping of the world's leading emerging economies, namely Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) on July 27, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Mike Hutchings/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Hutchings/AFP via Getty Images

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In 2010, gold surpassed $1400 an ounce for the first time. Today, it sits above $2300 an ounce. Al Grillo/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Al Grillo/ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

IRS, Ivies and GDP

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CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS - JUNE 29: People walk through the gate on Harvard Yard at the Harvard University campus on June 29, 2023 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

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March 1944: A cloud of ash hangs over Vesuvius during its worst eruption in more than 70 years. In the foreground is the city of Naples. The nearby towns of Massa and San Sebastiano were destroyed by the flow of lava. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images) Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

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LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images

What has been driving inflation? Economists' thinking may have changed

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