Huo Jingnan Huo Jingnan is a reporter for NPR.
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Huo Jingnan

Huo Jingnan

Reporter

Huo Jingnan is a reporter curious about how people navigate complex information landscapes and all the actors shaping that journey.

Previously, she was an associate producer on NPR's Investigations team, where she worked with journalists in the network and at member stations to produce original, in-depth reporting. She looked into how many homes sold by the federal government are in flood zones, investigated why face mask guidelines differ between countries, and helped gauge the federal government's role behind black lung disease's resurgence. The projects she worked on have won awards including Edward Murrow Award, NASEM Communications award, Silver Gavel Award, and have also been nominated for Emmy Awards and George Foster Peabody awards.

Huo has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and a bachelor's degree in law from Southwest University of Political Science and Law in Chongqing, China.

Story Archive

Ballot counters process absentee ballots on Nov. 8 at Huntington Place in Detroit. The scene this year was much calmer than 2020, when protesters descended on Detroit and yelled for election officials to "stop the count!" Jose Juarez/AP hide caption

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Jose Juarez/AP

Election officials feared the worst. Here's why baseless claims haven't fueled chaos

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Police tape is seen in front of the home of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her husband, Paul Pelosi, on Friday in San Francisco. Paul Pelosi was violently attacked in their home by an intruder. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Misinformation can further distort political messaging accepted by immigrants

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A voter hands over his ballot to an election judge at a drive-through ballot drop site in Denver on June 28, 2022. State election authorities accidentally sent voter registration information to 30,000 non-citizens who are ineligible to vote, which has fed conspiracy theories about the upcoming midterms. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images
Koko Nakajima and Huo Jingnan/NPR, Stephen Fowler/GPB and Sam Gringlas/WABE

A new Georgia voting law reduced ballot drop box access in places that used them most

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Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., questions Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson during the judge's confirmation hearing on March 22. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

NPR talked to nearly two dozen judges, attorneys and jurors who have participated in online jury trials. Nearly 18 months in, some evidence is in but the verdict is still out. Some fears were realized but there were unexpected benefits as well, including higher participation rate among people called to serve. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Ron Shehee had been at the federal prison complex in Lompoc, Calif., only a few months when the pandemic struck. Meron Menghistab for NPR hide caption

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Meron Menghistab for NPR

As COVID spread in federal prisons, many at-risk inmates tried and failed to get out

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A demonstrator wears a badge for the extremist group the Oath Keepers on a protective vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., the day before the Capitol siege. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Active-duty police in major U.S. cities appear on purported Oath Keepers rosters

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Homes that were sold by the Department of Housing and Urban Development between January 2017 and August 2020 are in federally designated flood zones at almost 75 times the rate of all homes sold nationwide in that period. New Jersey is one hot spot. Here, flooding from Tropical Storm Henri in Helmetta, N.J., this August. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes To Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

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Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center is one of the largest safety-net hospitals in the United States. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospitals Serving The Poor Struggled During COVID. Wealthy Hospitals Made Millions

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Before the flood, Aaron Trigg says, there were baseball games and kids playing on the playground near his house in Rainelle. After the flood, that changed. "Now, it was just silence," he remembers. "It affected the spirit of the town." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Looming Disaster: New Data Reveal Where Flood Damage Is An Existential Threat

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