Sylvie Douglis
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Sylvie Douglis

Sylvie Douglis

Story Archive

Kim Hawley and her father Jim Scherman nap on the couch in 1993. It can be helpful to start your interview with a warm-up question, such as sharing a favorite memory from childhood. Photograph by Gee Scherman; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photograph by Gee Scherman; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

Every family has stories to tell. Here's how to document yours

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Robert Leslie / TED

Emily Oster: Why wasn't the US tracking the spread of COVID-19 in schools?

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TED Radio Hour: Keller Rinaudo Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Keller Rinaudo: How can delivery drones save lives?

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Courtesy of TED

Amanda Little: What Is The Future Of Our Food?

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TED Radio Hour: Elise Hu sv_sunny/iStock hide caption

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sv_sunny/iStock

Elise Hu: The Beauty Ideal

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Two men (L and R) against "critical race theory" (CRT) being taught in schools, speak with a female counter protester(C) that wants CRT to be taught, during a rally at the Loudoun County Government center in Leesburg, Virginia on June 12, 2021. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Culture Wars Then and Now; Plus, The Creators of 'Hacks'

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ACT UP demonstration at Foley Square, Federal Plaza, June 30, 1987. From left to right: Steve Gendin, DoneMark Aurigemma, Douglas Montgomery,Charles Stimson, Frank O'Dowd, Avram Finkelstein. Donna Binder hide caption

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Donna Binder

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

Forty years ago this month, the CDC reported on patients with HIV/AIDS in the United States for the very first time. The disease was understudied, under-reported and deeply stigmatized. ACT UP united a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. In her new book, Let The Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, Sarah Schulman draws from nearly 200 interviews with ACT UP members to document the movement's history and explore how the group's activism transformed the way the media, the government, corporations and medical professionals talked about AIDS and provided treatment. She and Sam discuss this transformation and its relevance to social movements today.

ACT UP: A History Of AIDS/HIV Activism

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Maricopa County ballots cast in the 2020 general election are examined and recounted by contractors working for Florida-based company, Cyber Ninjas at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix on May 6, 2021. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

What's This Arizona Recount About? Plus, Summer Movie Picks

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Demonstrators blocked Market Street in an attempt to shut down the annual Pride Parade in San Francisco, California, on Sunday, June 30, 2019. The group was anti-police. Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Kink, Cops And Corporations At Pride? Plus, Natalie Morales On 'Plan B'

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You don't have to go to the beach to enjoy a beach read. Katrin Ray Shumakov/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrin Ray Shumakov/Getty Images

Hot Book Summer

It's almost summer, and whether you're at a beach, at a park, or at home, it's a great time to get lost in a book. Sam is joined by Barrie Hardymon, senior editor of NPR's Weekend Edition, and Traci Thomas, host of the podcast The Stacks. They give advice on how to get back into the habit of reading and recommend a few great summer reads: Yolk by Mary H.K. Choi, How the Word Is Passed by Clint Smith, Wild Rain by Beverly Jenkins and Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor. They also play a special edition of "Who Said That?"

Hot Book Summer

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Patrons at SOCIAL!, a social distanced dance club, get their groove on in their own spotlights. Stephanie Berger/SOCIAL! hide caption

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Stephanie Berger/SOCIAL!

Labor Market Mysteries; Plus, Signs Of Life

The U.S. unemployment rate is still high... so why are we in a labor shortage? Sam chats with Stacey Vanek Smith, host of NPR's The Indicator, and Cardiff Garcia, former co-host of The Indicator, about the American job market and why businesses are having such a hard time hiring. Then, as vaccines have become more widely available and pandemic restrictions lift across the country, people are wandering back out into the world, having experiences they haven't had in over a year. We drop in on a few of these: a dance party, a first date, a game with friends — the small pleasures folks have missed that now feel monumental.

Labor Market Mysteries; Plus, Signs Of Life

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Michelle Buteau attends the Tales of the City New York premiere at The Metrograph on June 3, 2019 in New York City. Dia Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/WireImage

After Defunding The Police; Plus, Michelle Buteau On 'The Circle'

What does defunding the police really look like? Sam talks to Austin City Council Member Greg Casar about how decreasing the city's police budget has worked— and what they aren't getting quite right yet. Then, Sam talks to KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy about how Texas, a Republican-led state, has responded and what that could mean for other cities trying to follow in the footsteps of Austin. Plus, Sam talks to actress and comedian Michelle Buteau about hosting the Netflix reality competition show The Circle and how she feels about being cast as the sassy best friend.

After Defunding The Police; Plus, Michelle Buteau On 'The Circle'

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Presidents Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Joseph Biden, and Lyndon Baines Johnson. Melina Mara/Getty Images and AFP Staff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Melina Mara/Getty Images and AFP Staff/AFP via Getty Images

Is Biden The Next FDR? or LBJ?

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The U.S. housing market is booming— who does that benefit? Charles Harker/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Harker/Getty Images

Housing Boom For Whom? Plus, 'Ziwe' Premieres

The housing market is booming— but who actually benefits? Sam talks to Jerusalem Demsas, politics and policy fellow for Vox, about what so many are getting wrong about housing. Plus, Sam revisits his 2020 conversation with Ziwe Fumudoh, whose comedy variety show Ziwe premieres on Showtime on May 9. Then, in honor of NPR's 50th anniversary, Sam plays "Who Said That?" with All Things Considered hosts Audie Cornish and Ari Shapiro.

Housing Boom For Whom? Plus, 'Ziwe' Premieres

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People wait to receive COVID-19 vaccine in Mumbai, India, Thursday, April 29, 2021. India set another global record in new virus cases Thursday. Rajanish Kakade/AP hide caption

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Rajanish Kakade/AP

India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

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