Chloee Weiner
Chloee Weiner, photographed for NPR, 27 July 2019, in Washington DC.
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Chloee Weiner

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Monday

The largest snow crystal ever photographed, according to scientist Kenneth Libbrecht. It measures 10 mm from tip to tip. Kenneth Libbrecht hide caption

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Kenneth Libbrecht

Winter storm brings snow to the East Coast. But what's in a snowflake?

A winter storm brought heavy rain and snow to parts of the East Coast this weekend, which got us thinking about snowflakes. Those intricate, whimsical crystals are a staple of magical wintry scenes, but how big can they really get? Well, according to the Guinness World Record keepers, the "largest snowflake" ever recorded was a whopping 15 inches in diameter. It was spotted near Missoula, Montana in 1887. But Kenneth Libbrecht, a physicist at Caltech, has long been skeptical of that record. So he set out to find what makes a snowflake a snowflake and whether that 1887 record is scientifically possible. You can read more about what he discovered here.

Winter storm brings snow to the East Coast. But what's in a snowflake?

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Thursday

Listening to our favorite songs can trigger feelings of awe and wonder in our brains—and there's a scientific reason for that. Plus, two other stories on the science behind music. Ralf Hiemisch/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralf Hiemisch/Getty Images

A year in music science: wonder, volume and animals that groove

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Wednesday

COP28 president Sultan al-Jaber of the United Arab Emirates at the annual climate meeting in Dubai. Getty Images Europe hide caption

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Getty Images Europe

Friday

A recent study published in the journal iScience found that the diversity of animals emojis more than doubled from 2015 to 2022, but notes that there is still unequal representation of organisms among emojis. Stefano Mammola, Mattia Falaschi, Gentile Francesco Ficetola hide caption

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Stefano Mammola, Mattia Falaschi, Gentile Francesco Ficetola

More nature emojis could be better for biodiversity

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Friday

All democracies are fragile—here are the early signs of civil war at home and abroad

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Sunday

Former first lady Rosalynn Carter looks at a birthday cake with her husband, former President Jimmy Carter, during his 90th birthday celebration held at Georgia Southwestern University, Oct. 4, 2014, in Americus, Ga. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Branden Camp/AP

Rosalynn Carter, transformative former first lady and mental health advocate, dies

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Friday

Marla Aufmuth / TED

When the proverbial 'seat at the table' is not what you expect it to be

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Friday

Photo Courtesy of TED

How labor unions shaped America

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Thursday

Abra Lee is a horticulturalist who studies U.S. gardening history. She fondly remembers her own relatives' gardens as holding a special place in horticultural history. Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee hide caption

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Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee

Honoring the 'hidden figures' of Black gardening

When Abra Lee became the landscape manager at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, she sought some advice about how to best do the job. The answer: study the history of gardening. That led to her uncovering how Black involvement in horticulture in the U.S. bursts with incredible stories and profound expertise, intertwined with a tragic past. She's now teaching these stories and working on a book, Conquer the Soil: Black America and the Untold Stories of Our Country's Gardeners, Farmers, and Growers. Abra Lee talks with former Short Wave producer Eva Tesfaye about uncovering Black horticultural history and several of the hidden figures who shaped it.

Honoring the 'hidden figures' of Black gardening

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Thursday

The Clade family in Disney's Strange World. Disney hide caption

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Disney

Tuesday

Timothée Chalamet as Lee and Taylor Russell as Maren in Bones and All. Yannis Drakoulidis/Metro Goldwyn Mayer hide caption

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Yannis Drakoulidis/Metro Goldwyn Mayer

Tuesday

Lindsay Lohan and Chord Overstreet star in Netflix's Falling for Christmas. Scott Everett White/Netflix hide caption

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Scott Everett White/Netflix

Tuesday

Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki star in The Crown Keith Bernstein hide caption

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Keith Bernstein

Monday

In Mood, Nicôle Lecky plays Sasha Clayton, a young woman who gets pulled into the worlds of social media and sex work. Natalie Seery/BBC Studios/Bonafi hide caption

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Natalie Seery/BBC Studios/Bonafi

Thursday

Kate Micucci as Stacey in "The Outside." Ken Woroner/Netflix hide caption

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Ken Woroner/Netflix

Friday

Lyric Ross voices Kat, a rebellious new student at Rust Bank Catholic School for Girls. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Tuesday

Carly Rae Jepsen's latest album The Loneliest Time was released on October 21, 2022. Meredith Jenks hide caption

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Meredith Jenks

Monday

Park Hae-il and Tang Wei in a scene from Decision to Leave. MUBI hide caption

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MUBI

Thursday

Wednesday

A runner takes a quick drink during training at the Australian Athletics Olympic Teams training camp at Nudgee College in Brisbane, Australia. Darren England/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren England/Getty Images

Water Water Everywhere, But How Much Do You Really Need?

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Wednesday

Illustration of the expansion of the Universe. The Cosmos began 13.7 billion years ago (left). Immediately it began expanding and cooling (stage 1). Its expansion slowed about 10 billion years ago (stage 2). We are now at stage 4. The expansion shows no signs of stopping and is in fact accelerating. The orange arrows indicate the force of gravity, which slows but does not stop the expansion. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

What The Universe Is Doing RIGHT NOW

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Thursday

This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows hundreds of thousands of stars crowded into the swirling core of our spiral Milky Way galaxy. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Thursday

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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NASA/Kim Shiflett

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

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Tuesday