Chloee Weiner
Chloee Weiner, photographed for NPR, 27 July 2019, in Washington DC.
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Chloee Weiner

Story Archive

Thursday

The Clade family in Disney's Strange World. Disney hide caption

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Disney

Tuesday

Timothée Chalamet as Lee and Taylor Russell as Maren in Bones and All. Yannis Drakoulidis/Metro Goldwyn Mayer hide caption

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Yannis Drakoulidis/Metro Goldwyn Mayer

Tuesday

Lindsay Lohan and Chord Overstreet star in Netflix's Falling for Christmas. Scott Everett White/Netflix hide caption

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Scott Everett White/Netflix

Tuesday

Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki star in The Crown Keith Bernstein hide caption

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Keith Bernstein

Monday

In Mood, Nicôle Lecky plays Sasha Clayton, a young woman who gets pulled into the worlds of social media and sex work. Natalie Seery/BBC Studios/Bonafi hide caption

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Natalie Seery/BBC Studios/Bonafi

Thursday

Kate Micucci as Stacey in "The Outside." Ken Woroner/Netflix hide caption

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Ken Woroner/Netflix

Friday

Lyric Ross voices Kat, a rebellious new student at Rust Bank Catholic School for Girls. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Tuesday

Carly Rae Jepsen's latest album The Loneliest Time was released on October 21, 2022. Meredith Jenks hide caption

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Meredith Jenks

Monday

Park Hae-il and Tang Wei in a scene from Decision to Leave. MUBI hide caption

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MUBI

Thursday

Wednesday

A runner takes a quick drink during training at the Australian Athletics Olympic Teams training camp at Nudgee College in Brisbane, Australia. Darren England/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren England/Getty Images

Water Water Everywhere, But How Much Do You Really Need?

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Wednesday

Illustration of the expansion of the Universe. The Cosmos began 13.7 billion years ago (left). Immediately it began expanding and cooling (stage 1). Its expansion slowed about 10 billion years ago (stage 2). We are now at stage 4. The expansion shows no signs of stopping and is in fact accelerating. The orange arrows indicate the force of gravity, which slows but does not stop the expansion. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

What The Universe Is Doing RIGHT NOW

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Thursday

This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows hundreds of thousands of stars crowded into the swirling core of our spiral Milky Way galaxy. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Thursday

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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NASA/Kim Shiflett

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

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Tuesday