Willa Rubin Willa Rubin is an associate producer at Planet Money.
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Willa Rubin

Corinne Louie
Willa Rubin headshot
Corinne Louie

Willa Rubin

Associate Producer, Planet Money

Willa Rubin is an associate producer at Planet Money, and she likes telling stories that explore how the economy impacts everyday people. Before joining Planet Money, she helped launch and co-produced Gimlet Media and the Wall Street Journal's podcast "The Journal," a daily news show which has won awards from the New York Press Club and from the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. She previously interned at The Indicator from Planet Money. She has a master's degree in journalism from the Craig Newmark School of Journalism at CUNY and studied politics at Oberlin College. She's a lifelong New Yorker and loves cats.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Wednesday

How Big Steel in the U.S. fell

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Wednesday

The Norwegian supermarket chain REMA 1000 uses dynamic pricing for all the items in its stores, including Kvikk Lunsj chocolate bars and Solo soda. Jessica Robinson/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Robinson/NPR

Is dynamic pricing coming to a supermarket near you?

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Friday

A controversial idea at the heart of Bidenomics

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Wednesday

Wednesday

Wednesday

Simon McGill/Malachite Photography/Getty Images

Hear us out: We ban left turns and other big ideas

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Wednesday

Kenny Malone, Jeff Guo, Wailin Wong/NPR

The Indicators of this year and next

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Friday

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Friday

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Endless shrimp and other indicators

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Tuesday

David McNew/Getty Images

Oil prices and the Israel-Hamas war

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Friday

Friday

Friday

The UAW's decade-long fight to form a union at VW's Chattanooga plant

Union membership in the U.S. has been declining for decades. But, in 2022, support for unions among Americans was the highest it's been in decades. This dissonance is due, in part, to the difficulties of one important phase in the life cycle of a union: setting up a union in the first place. One place where that has been particularly clear is at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The UAW's decade-long fight to form a union at VW's Chattanooga plant

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Friday

Ramón Méndez Galain was Uruguay's National Director of Energy from 2008 to 2015. His plan for the energy sector led to 98% of Uruguay's grid being powered by green energy. And a good deal of that comes from wind energy — from turbines like those behind him. Amanda Aronczyk/NPR hide caption

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Amanda Aronczyk/NPR

How did Uruguay cut carbon emissions? The answer is blowing in the wind

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Wednesday

"Based on a true story"

When a group of amateur investors rallied around the stock for GameStop back in 2021, the story blew up the internet. News outlets around the world, including us here at Planet Money, rushed in to explain why the stock for this retail video game company was suddenly skyrocketing, at times by as much as 1700% in value, and what that meant for the rest of us.

"Based on a true story"

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Saturday

Economists challenge maxim: For inflation to go down, unemployment needs to go up

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Friday

London School of Economics Image Library

Economists challenge maxim: For inflation to go down, unemployment needs to go up

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Friday

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Wednesday

Richard Lonsinger at his home in Lawrence, Kansas, holding a photo of himself as a child shortly after he was adopted. Sam Yellowhorse Kesler/NPR hide caption

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Sam Yellowhorse Kesler/NPR

Monday

Before pregnancy can start, an egg is released from the ovary, where it's scooped up and travels to the site of fertilization. Sperm might already be waiting — they can survive for several days on their own. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Sperm can't really swim and other surprising pregnancy facts

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Wednesday

Endometriosis may affect more than 10 percent of reproductive aged women. It's a major cause of infertility and can increase a person's risk for ovarian cancer. Getty Images hide caption

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This cellular atlas could lead to breakthroughs for endometriosis patients

For people with endometriosis—a mysterious disease where endometrial tissue grows outside of the uterus—medical visits can be especially frustrating. It takes some patients years (on average, ten years) to get a diagnosis and treatment options are limited. There are currently no cures. One researcher, Dr. Kate Lawrenson, is trying to change that. She and her team of researchers have created a cellular atlas of the disease and hope this cell-by-cell approach will open up doors for faster diagnosis options and better ways of managing it. In the meantime, she hopes that more people will learn about the disease in the first place.

This cellular atlas could lead to breakthroughs for endometriosis patients

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Monday

Smoking has been used around the world as a method to preserve food for thousands of years. This episode, we explore why it's also the key to tender, juicy meat. MIGUEL MENDEZ/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MIGUEL MENDEZ/AFP via Getty Images

Chemistry says tender meat is cooked low and slow

Chefs will tell you, cooking is not just an art — it's a science. And the spirit of summer barbecues, NPR science correspondent Sydney Lupkin brings us this piece about how understanding the chemistry of cooking meat can help you perfect your barbeque. It's all about low and slow cooking.

Chemistry says tender meat is cooked low and slow

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