Franco Ordoñez Franco Ordoñez is an NPR White House correspondent.
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Franco Ordoñez

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Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Franco Ordoñez

White House Correspondent

Franco Ordoñez is a White House Correspondent for NPR's Washington Desk. Before he came to NPR in 2019, Ordoñez covered the White House for McClatchy. He has also written about diplomatic affairs, foreign policy and immigration, and has been a correspondent in Cuba, Colombia, Mexico and Haiti.

Ordoñez has received several state and national awards for his work, including the Casey Medal, the Gerald Loeb Award and the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism. He is a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists, and is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and the University of Georgia.

Story Archive

President Biden discusses food security at the AFL-CIO Quadrennial Constitutional Convention on June 14 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hannah Beier/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Beier/Getty Images

Ahead of the G-7, Biden confronts Putin's latest geopolitical weapon — food

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President Biden wants a gas tax holiday. Some economists say that's a bad idea

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President Biden pitched a three-month break on the federal fuel tax to help American drivers face the highest inflation in four decades, but critics said the proposal is unlikely to work. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden railed against oil company profits at an event at the Port of Los Angeles, saying, "Exxon made more money than God last year." Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Why People In Republican-Leaning Areas Seem More Likely To Die Prematurely

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Biden aimed to band with South America but some countries were left out of the summit

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President Biden had hoped Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador would join him at the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles — but López Obrador snubbed the invitation Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

The U.S. is hosting the Summit of Americas for the first time since 1994

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The Summit of the Americas is often messy, and this year's looks to be no different

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U.S. President Joe Biden, second from right, meets with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, second from left, in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. adviser tries to talk Mexican president out of skipping Summit of the Americas

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Holding a sign reading "No negotiation with terrorists," Cuba supporters protest in Miami ahead of bilateral talks between the U.S. and Cuba in Washington in April. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Anatolii Kulibaba, 70, discusses challenges getting his farm in Bilka, Ukraine working again after Russians occupied on April 19, 2022. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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Russians wreak havoc on Ukrainian farms, mining fields and stealing equipment

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