Franco Ordoñez Franco Ordoñez is an NPR White House correspondent.
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Franco Ordoñez

U.S. President Joe Biden, second from right, meets with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, second from left, in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. adviser tries to talk Mexican president out of skipping Summit of the Americas

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Holding a sign reading "No negotiation with terrorists," Cuba supporters protest in Miami ahead of bilateral talks between the U.S. and Cuba in Washington in April. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Anatolii Kulibaba, 70, discusses challenges getting his farm in Bilka, Ukraine working again after Russians occupied on April 19, 2022. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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Franco Ordoñez /NPR

Russians wreak havoc on Ukrainian farms, mining fields and stealing equipment

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Father Oleksandr Yarmolchyk stands inside the demolished nave of his Orthodox church in Peremoha, Ukraine on April 17. He says the Russians bombed his church and held him against his will. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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Franco Ordoñez /NPR

The complex effort to hold Vladimir Putin accountable for war crimes

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Ukraine's prosecutor general is determined to hold Russia accountable for atrocities

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A man pushes his bike through mud and debris past a destroyed Russian tank as he surveys damage in front of the central train station that was used as a Russian base, on March 30, in Trostyanets, Ukraine. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainian doctors describe delivering babies as Russia shelled the hospital

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Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has announced plans to meet on Sunday with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

2 U.S. Cabinet officials will meet with Zelenskyy in Kyiv

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The latest on the probe into atrocities committed by Russian forces around Kyiv

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Overnight missile strikes have killed at least 7 in Lviv, Ukraine

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Alyona Shkrum, a 34-year-old member of parliament, is among a new class of Ukrainian leaders who are pushing their country to a more Europe-focused future. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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War crystalizes young Ukrainian leaders' calls for a future aligned with Europe

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Olena Kopchak, her husband, Albert Kodua, and their eight-year-old daughter, Yana, are staying in a small 250-square-foot apartment in Warsaw, Poland. They hope to make it to the United States. Franco Ordoñez /NPR hide caption

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Even with ties, Ukrainian families struggle to reach the United States

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President Biden attends a G7 leaders meeting during a NATO summit on Russia's invasion of Ukraine, at the alliance's headquarters in Brussels, on Thursday. Henry Nicholls/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, tests positive again for COVID

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Politics chat: Biden travels to Brussels; Supreme Court confirmation hearings start

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