Pien Huang Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
Pien Huang
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Pien Huang

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Pien Huang
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Pien Huang

Reporter, Science Desk

Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.

She's a former producer for WBUR/NPR's On Point and was a 2018 Environmental Reporting Fellow with The GroundTruth Project at WCAI in Cape Cod, covering the human impact on climate change. As a freelance audio and digital reporter, Huang's stories on the environment, arts and culture have been featured on NPR, the BBC and PRI's The World.

Huang's experiences span categories and continents. She was executive producer of Data Made to Matter, a podcast from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and was also an adjunct instructor in podcasting and audio journalism at Northeastern University. She worked as a project manager for public artist Ralph Helmick to help plan and execute The Founder's Memorial in Abu Dhabi and with Stoltze Design to tell visual stories through graphic design. Huang has traveled with scientists looking for signs of environmental change in Cameroon's frogs, in Panama's plants and in the ocean water off the ice edge of Antarctica. She has a degree in environmental science and public policy from Harvard.

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The World Health Organization in Geneva has faced criticism from President Trump over its handling of the pandemic. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

A CT scan of the chest of a 66-year-old male reveals patchy rounded hazy spots throughout the lungs. He had tested positive for the coronavirus and experienced shortness of breath. Steven Needell/Science Source hide caption

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Steven Needell/Science Source

From left: Colorized transmission electron micrograph of herpes simplex virus, Ebola virus and SARS-CoV-2 virus particles. Researchers now believe the coronavirus is likely to be a continuing threat until a vaccine is developed. NIAID; NIH; NIH hide caption

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NIAID; NIH; NIH

Nothing Like SARS: Researchers Warn The Coronavirus Will Not Fade Away Anytime Soon

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The World Health Organization's Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, here at a press conference earlier this year, gave his reaction Monday to President Trump's declaration about funding the agency. Tedros said he learned of Trump's decision from the president's briefing. Denis Balibouse/Reuters hide caption

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters

What Happened Today: Trump Threatens To Move RNC, Global Impact Questions

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