Pien Huang Pien Huang is NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
Pien Huang
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Pien Huang

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Pien Huang
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Pien Huang

Reflect America Fellow

Pien Huang is NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online. She's a former producer for WBUR/NPR's On Point and was a 2018 Environmental Reporting Fellow with The GroundTruth Project at WCAI in Cape Cod, covering the human impact on climate change. As a freelance audio and digital reporter, Huang's stories on the environment, arts and culture have been featured on NPR, the BBC, and PRI's The World.

Huang's experiences span categories and continents. She was executive producer of Data Made to Matter, a podcast from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and was also an adjunct instructor in podcasting and audio journalism at Northeastern University. She worked as a project manager for public artist Ralph Helmick to help plan and execute The Founder's Memorial in Abu Dhabi, and with Stoltze Design to tell visual stories through graphic design. Huang has traveled with scientists looking for signs of environmental change in Cameroon's frogs, in Panama's plants, and in the ocean water off the ice edge of Antarctica. She has a degree in environmental science and public policy from Harvard.

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Story Archive

Diver swimming over Elkhorn Coral in the Florida Keys. Elevated nutrients as well as elevated temperatures are causing a massive loss of this iconic branching species in Florida. JW Porter/University of Georgia hide caption

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JW Porter/University of Georgia

Florida's Corals Are Dying Off, But It's Not All Due To Climate Change, Study Says

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This oblique view of the Himalayan landscape was captured by a KH-9 Hexagon satellite on Dec. 20, 1975, on the border between eastern Nepal and Sikkim, India. Josh Maurer/LDEO hide caption

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Josh Maurer/LDEO

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

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A Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis Papua) walks across the rocky beach at Yankee Harbour in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

The Fung Wah Biennial celebrates the now-defunct Chinatown bus service. For her performance piece, Sunita Prasad crowdsurfed around the bus. Bryan Chang/Fung Wah Biennial hide caption

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Bryan Chang/Fung Wah Biennial

Artists Pay Tribute To No-Frills Chinatown Bus, Discomforts And All

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