Pien Huang Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
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Pien Huang

Study: For HIV-Infected Babies, Treatment Should Start At Birth

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Malassezia is a genus of fungi naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals, including humans. The researchers found it in urban apartments, although some strains have been known to cause infections in hospitals. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Grandmother Maria Jose holds her twin granddaughters Heloisa (right) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, during their one-year birthday party on April 16, 2017, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Naked mole rats are eusocial, which means they live all crowded together, in a colony underground. Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source

In Defense Of Naked Mole Rats And What We Can Learn From Them

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A common guillemot (Uria aalge) brings a sprat to feed to its chick. The laying dates of this species were followed for 19 consecutive years on the Isle of May, off the coast of southeast Scotland. According to a new paper in Nature Communications, many birds are adapting to climate change — but probably not fast enough. Michael P. Harris hide caption

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Michael P. Harris

Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Diver swimming over Elkhorn Coral in the Florida Keys. Elevated nutrients as well as elevated temperatures are causing a massive loss of this iconic branching species in Florida. JW Porter/University of Georgia hide caption

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JW Porter/University of Georgia

Florida's Corals Are Dying Off, But It's Not All Due To Climate Change, Study Says

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This oblique view of the Himalayan landscape was captured by a KH-9 Hexagon satellite on Dec. 20, 1975, on the border between eastern Nepal and Sikkim, India. Josh Maurer/LDEO hide caption

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Josh Maurer/LDEO

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

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