Pien Huang Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
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Pien Huang

A person wearing protective equipment at a coronavirus testing site for first responders, on Monday in Los Angeles. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The Coronavirus Is Mutating Relatively Slowly, Which May Be Good News

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(At left) A colorized electron micrograph image of the influenza virus. (At right) Color-enhanced electron micrograph image of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

An office worker is screened with an infrared thermometer as he enters a building in New Delhi, India. Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Are Wuhan Residents Coping Mentally After 7 Weeks Of Quarantine?

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Cough into your elbow, not your hand. Or pull the collar of your T-shirt up to cover your mouth when coughing. That's the coughing advice from experts who seek to minimize risk of viral transmission. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

The Metropole Hotel in Hong Kong was ground zero for a super-spreading event during the 2003 SARS outbreak. K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

What's A 'Super-Spreading Event'? And Has It Happened With COVID-19?

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A horseshoe bat. Bats are known to carry many different strains of viruses but do not get sick from them. Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

Bats Carry Many Viruses. So Why Don't They Get Sick?

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As the death toll from the new coronavirus tops 100, hospitals in Wuhan, China, are attending to many patients with confirmed or suspected cases of the illness. Public health officials are working to prevent further spread of the outbreak in China and globally. Xiong Qi/AP hide caption

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Xiong Qi/AP

As more cases continue to be confirmed, health officials and medical works in Wuhan, China, and throughout the country ramp up efforts to contain the spread. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP