Pien Huang Pien Huang is a health reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
Pien Huang
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Pien Huang

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Pien Huang
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Pien Huang

Reporter, Science Desk

Pien Huang is a health reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.

She's a former producer for WBUR/NPR's On Point and was a 2018 Environmental Reporting Fellow with The GroundTruth Project at WCAI in Cape Cod, covering the human impact on climate change. As a freelance audio and digital reporter, Huang's stories on the environment, arts and culture have been featured on NPR, the BBC and PRI's The World.

Huang's experiences span categories and continents. She was executive producer of Data Made to Matter, a podcast from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and was also an adjunct instructor in podcasting and audio journalism at Northeastern University. She worked as a project manager for public artist Ralph Helmick to help plan and execute The Founder's Memorial in Abu Dhabi and with Stoltze Design to tell visual stories through graphic design. Huang has traveled with scientists looking for signs of environmental change in Cameroon's frogs, in Panama's plants and in the ocean water off the ice edge of Antarctica. She has a degree in environmental science and public policy from Harvard.

Story Archive

Wednesday

As soda consumption has dropped in the West, companies are making an effort to woo new customers in other places. This Coke bottle ad is in Mozambique. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Wednesday

Islenia Milien for NPR

In praise of being late: The upside of spurning the clock

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Friday

Encore: Short on community health workers, a county trains teens as youth ambassadors

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Sunday

Bithaniya Fieseha, a high school senior, graduates from the Youth Public Health Ambassador program run by Virginia's Fairfax County Health Department. Will Schermerhorn/Fairfax County Health Department hide caption

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Will Schermerhorn/Fairfax County Health Department

Short on community health workers, a county trains teens as youth ambassadors

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Tuesday

New doctors aren't choosing to go into infectious disease

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Monday

Despite its central role in the COVID pandemic, the infectious diseases specialty saw 44% of its training programs for doctors go unfilled. Boy_Anupong/Getty Images hide caption

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Boy_Anupong/Getty Images

Wednesday

Encore: Infusions of antibodies used to treat COVID are being phased out

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Monday

The disease formerly known as monkeypox has a new name

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Sunday

Antonio Rapuano got an infusion of a monoclonal antibody to treat his COVID in Albano, Italy in 2021. Such infusions have been effective treatments for COVID during the pandemic, but doctors are now finding that most monoclonal antibodies no longer work against new variants of SARS-CoV-2. Yara Nardi/Reuters hide caption

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Yara Nardi/Reuters

How monoclonal antibodies lost the fight with new COVID variants

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Tuesday

Thursday

The federal government's new opioid prescribing guidelines may help doctors better manage patients with chronic pain who need consistent doses of pain medicines. For example, one patient takes tramadol regularly for serious pain caused by osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Wednesday

CDC underscores the importance of Black and Hispanic adults getting flu shots

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Monday

Studies show that monkeypox isn't easy to catch from respiratory droplets or contaminated objects. It's one of the reasons that the virus hasn't spread more widely in the U.S. AP hide caption

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AP

Monkeypox cases in the U.S. are way down — can the virus be eliminated?

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Tuesday

Monkeypox cases in the U.S. have been falling since a peak in early August

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