Pien Huang Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.
Pien Huang
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Pien Huang

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Pien Huang
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Pien Huang

Reporter, Science Desk

Pien Huang is a global health and development reporter on the Science desk. She was NPR's first Reflect America Fellow, working with shows, desks and podcasts to bring more diverse voices to air and online.

She's a former producer for WBUR/NPR's On Point and was a 2018 Environmental Reporting Fellow with The GroundTruth Project at WCAI in Cape Cod, covering the human impact on climate change. As a freelance audio and digital reporter, Huang's stories on the environment, arts and culture have been featured on NPR, the BBC and PRI's The World.

Huang's experiences span categories and continents. She was executive producer of Data Made to Matter, a podcast from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and was also an adjunct instructor in podcasting and audio journalism at Northeastern University. She worked as a project manager for public artist Ralph Helmick to help plan and execute The Founder's Memorial in Abu Dhabi and with Stoltze Design to tell visual stories through graphic design. Huang has traveled with scientists looking for signs of environmental change in Cameroon's frogs, in Panama's plants and in the ocean water off the ice edge of Antarctica. She has a degree in environmental science and public policy from Harvard.

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A nurse administers the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine at Kedren Community Health Center, in South Central Los Angeles, California on February 16, 2021. APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

On Jan. 19, the incoming Biden administration hosted memorial to lives lost to COVID-19 at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. Since then another 100,000 Americans have died. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How To Register For The Coronavirus Vaccine In Your State

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Is It Ever OK To Jump Ahead In The Vaccine Line?

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Unpacking The Variations In Vaccine Efficacy Data

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Biden Announces Plans To Boost COVID-19 Vaccine Supply

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100 Million Shots In 100 Days: Is Biden's COVID-19 Vaccination Goal Achievable?

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Dr. Kristamarie Collman, a family physician in Orlando, has been dispelling vaccine myths through social media. She's among a growing cohort of Black doctors trying to reach vaccine-hesitant members of their communities. Kristamarie Collman hide caption

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Kristamarie Collman

Air Travelers To U.S. Must Test Negative For COVID-19 Before Boarding

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A health care worker with the Florida Department of Health administers a Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine at a retirement community in Pompano Beach, Fla. New Trump administration guidance arrived Tuesday, urging states to make all people over 65 eligible for the vaccine. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. COVID-19 vaccination programs are off to a slow start, but with more funding, better coordination and public awareness campaigns, things could speed up, experts say. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

What's The State Of COVID-19 Vaccination In The U.S.?

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