Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

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The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Coronavirus Relief Package Negotiations Stalled After Nearly 2 Weeks

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Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., (left) speaks before the start of a House Natural Resources Committee in June. Grijalva recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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As More Lawmakers Test Positive, Congress Gets A Tough Reminder Of Coronavirus Risk

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U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, tested positive for the coronavirus during a routine screening at the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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GOP Relief Bill Sets The Stage For A Showdown With Democrats

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., with President Trump at the White House. The Republican Party has unveiled a new pandemic relief bill, but tough negotiations lie ahead with Democrats. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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After Delays, Republicans Rolled Out A New Pandemic Relief Bill. Democrats Balked

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Senate GOP To Release $1 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Bill

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., is seen during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on May 6. The Iraq War veteran is on Joe Biden's vice presidential shortlist. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Tammy Duckworth's Stock Rises As A Possible VP Choice After High-Profile Weeks

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Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, North Carolina is one of the ten U.S. Army bases named after Confederate military leaders. Congress is considering legislation to change those names as part of the national movement to address racial discrimination. Chris Seward/AP hide caption

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Chris Seward/AP

Lawmakers Leverage Defense Bill To Address Police Reform, Racial Injustice

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Congress To Start Debate On Annual Defense Bill

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The Bernie Beck Gate at Fort Hood, Texas. An effort to remove Confederate names from military bases has broad bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress, but President Trump is vowing to veto the defense bill if the provision stays in. Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Congress Wants Answers From Trump On Russian Bounties In Afghanistan

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