Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

From left to right, Aijah Crockett and Lisa Griffin join their friend visiting from New York, Dom Carter, at Jack D. Hughes Memorial Park in Pineville, N.C. Crockett and Griffin are both Charlotte area residents who are voting for Democrat Joe Biden. Claudia Grisales/NPR hide caption

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Claudia Grisales/NPR

In N.C., Young Voters Of Color Uninspired By Biden See Defeating Trump As Essential

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North Carolina's Young Voters Could Play A Decisive Role In November Election

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Coronavirus Pandemic Changes How Voters Watch Party Conventions

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Congress Stalled In COVID-19 Relief Bill Discussions

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Coronavirus Relief Package Negotiations Stalled After Nearly 2 Weeks

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Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., (left) speaks before the start of a House Natural Resources Committee in June. Grijalva recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

As More Lawmakers Test Positive, Congress Gets A Tough Reminder Of Coronavirus Risk

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U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, tested positive for the coronavirus during a routine screening at the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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GOP Relief Bill Sets The Stage For A Showdown With Democrats

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., with President Trump at the White House. The Republican Party has unveiled a new pandemic relief bill, but tough negotiations lie ahead with Democrats. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

After Delays, Republicans Rolled Out A New Pandemic Relief Bill. Democrats Balked

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Senate GOP To Release $1 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Bill

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Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., is seen during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on May 6. The Iraq War veteran is on Joe Biden's vice presidential shortlist. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Tammy Duckworth's Stock Rises As A Possible VP Choice After High-Profile Weeks

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Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, North Carolina is one of the ten U.S. Army bases named after Confederate military leaders. Congress is considering legislation to change those names as part of the national movement to address racial discrimination. Chris Seward/AP hide caption

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Chris Seward/AP

Lawmakers Leverage Defense Bill To Address Police Reform, Racial Injustice

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Congress To Start Debate On Annual Defense Bill

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The Bernie Beck Gate at Fort Hood, Texas. An effort to remove Confederate names from military bases has broad bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress, but President Trump is vowing to veto the defense bill if the provision stays in. Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images