Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

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Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

Story Archive

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., decided to create a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection after a bipartisan bill to set up an outside commission was filibustered by Senate Republicans. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Launches Select Committee To Probe Jan. 6 Insurrection

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference Wednesday with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., at the U.S. Capitol. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawmakers Seek To Hold White House's First Food Insecurity Summit Since 1969

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Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., was the sponsor of the House bill to repeal the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force in Iraq. The measure now heads to the Senate. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Documents Show Trump Pressed DOJ Officials To Reverse Election Results

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House Democrats Ramping Up Probes Into Jan. 6 Insurrection

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New Jan. 6 Report Describes Intel Failures And The Warnings Police Got In December

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Violent rioters supporting then-President Donald Trump storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Capitol Police had seen information from a pro-Trump website that encouraged demonstrators to bring weapons to subdue members of Congress and police. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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For years, New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (left) has sought approval of her bill to reform the military's criminal justice system. This year, Gillibrand joined forces with Iowa Republican Sen. Joni Ernst, seen here, a sexual assault survivor herself before she became a combat company commander. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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The Effort To Reform The U.S. Military's Justice System Faces A New Fight

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Senate Republicans Have Blocked Jan. 6 Commission

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Majority Of Senate Republicans Remain Opposed To Insurrection Probe

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