Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

Story Archive

Rudy Giuliani, attorney for then-President Donald Trump, conducts a news conference at the Republican National Committee on lawsuits regarding the outcome of the 2020 presidential election on Nov. 19, 2020. Trump attorneys Jenna Ellis, far left, and Sydney Powell, second from left, and Boris Boris Epshteyn, right, also appear. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Republican House members objected to the certification of votes, allowed under the Electoral Count Act, from Nevada during a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2021. It was rejected because a senator did not join in the objection. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Democrats are looking for their way forward on voting rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072678590/1072678591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jan. 6 panel asks GOP leader Kevin McCarthy to voluntarily share information

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072552874/1072604429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hours after rioters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, Vice President Mike Pence listens after reading the final certification of the Electoral College votes cast in the 2020 presidential election. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

On Capitol Hill, President Biden and other leaders mark anniversary of Jan. 6 attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1071063988/1071063989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Newly installed surveillance cameras are positioned near the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A year after the Capitol riot, work remains to prevent another attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1070418884/1070436218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What U.S. Capitol security looks like a year after the Jan. 6 insurrection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1070338031/1070338032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Capitol Police Are Still Dealing With The Aftermath Of January 6th

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1070341218/1070345357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger was sworn in on July 23 after a nationwide search. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A year after the darkest day for Capitol Police, its new chief focuses on rebuilding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1068396411/1069837753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roger Stone, seen here departing federal court in Washington, D.C., in 2020, appeared Friday before the panel investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol and invoked his Fifth Amendment rights. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP