Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
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Claudia Grisales

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claudia
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

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Story Archive

Impeachment Inquiry: Witness Testimonies Continue This Week

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks with the media Wednesday after the Senate Policy Luncheon on Capitol Hill. McConnell said a Trump impeachment trial could begin by Thanksgiving. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Impeachment Inquiry Overshadows Hopes For Moving Legislation Forward

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Impeachment Inquiry: 2nd Whistleblower Comes Forward

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Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., won her House seat by a razor-thin margin in 2018. Her support for an impeachment inquiry risks alienating voters in a closely divided swing district. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Pa. Swing District Voters Hope Impeachment Doesn't Overshadow Other Issues

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How Rep. Susan Wild Is Balancing The Impeachment Inquiry, Her Constituents' Concerns

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From left, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., and Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., are receiving the 2019 Civility Award by Allegheny College for teaming up on criminal justice reform. Mhari Shaw /NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw /NPR

'Game Recognizes Game': A Bipartisan Bond In The Age Of Impeachment

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Hearing On Military Domestic Violence

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House Judiciary Panel Takes Up Gun Control Measures To Pressure Republicans

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Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, is conducting multiple investigations into issues that he and others say could be impeachable offenses for President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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A U.S. Customs and Border Protection vehicle sits near the wall as President Trump visits a new section of the border wall with Mexico in El Centro, Calif., on April 5. This area is one where the Pentagon will spend more resources shifted away from military construction projects. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

These Are The Military Projects Losing Funding To Trump's Border Wall

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Workers break ground on new border wall construction about 20 miles west of Santa Teresa, N.M., last month. The Trump administration has started the arduous process of canceling $3.6 billion in military construction projects to fund its plans to build more of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP