Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional correspondent for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Correspondent

Claudia Grisales is a congressional correspondent assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

Story Archive

How productive a divided government can be

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Alongside Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA) and Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV), Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a news conference about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) outside the U.S. Capitol. Democrats called on Republicans to join them in passing DACA legislation during the lame-duck session. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced she'll end her run as the top House Democrat

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Republicans celebrate after reaching the threshold to win control of the House

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With some elections undecided, Congress returns for a busy lame-duck session

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US President Joe Biden (R) and China's President Xi Jinping (L) shake hands as they meet on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 14, 2022. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Congress searches for a path forward as control of the House remains in limbo

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Without a clear majority, Republican leaders are facing concerns

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Some Trump-backed candidates didn't do as well as the GOP thought they would

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Joe Kent, center, a Trump-endorsed Republican who is challenging Herrera Beutler, speaks during a "Justice For J6" rally near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, on Sept. 18, 2021, in support of people who took part in the Jan. 6 insurrection. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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A Washington congressional district is weighing the election of a far-right candidate

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Left: Mike Erickson, a Republican candidate from Oregon, running for the U.S. House, appears in a photo provided Oct. 11. Right: Rep. Andrea Salinas, D-Lake Oswego, speaks at a PCUN rally to kick off a campaign for farmworker overtime on Nov. 16, 2021 at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore. Reuters; Abigail Dollins/Statesman Journal/USA Today Network/Reuters hide caption

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Reuters; Abigail Dollins/Statesman Journal/USA Today Network/Reuters

A tight congressional race in Oregon could signal the breadth of the GOP's reach

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