Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

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House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., speaks during a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol about lawsuit he and other Republican leaders filed against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and congressional officials in an effort to block the House of Representatives from using a proxy voting system to allow for remote voting during the coronavirus pandemic. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., walks past the Statuary Hall ahead of floor debate on a record $3 trillion coronavirus response package Friday to fund the fight against the pandemic and provide emergency payments to millions of Americans. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Members of congress practice social distancing as the House Rules Committee meets to consider a resolution authorizing remote voting by proxy in the House of Representatives during a public health emergency due to the coronavirus outbreak, and to formulate a rule on the newest coronavirus relief bill on Capitol Hill on Thursday. Erin Scott/Reuters hide caption

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Erin Scott/Reuters

Members of the House stand after they passed the $2 trillion-plus coronavirus stimulus package in March at the Capitol. AP hide caption

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AP

Debate Over Reopening Puts Partisan Divide On Full Display

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Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., here in February, is temporarily stepping aside as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee during the investigation of his stock sales. He has denied any wrongdoing. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A Debate On When The Lawmakers Will Return To D.C. Faces Partisan Divide

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Amid the coronavirus pandemic, a masked pedestrian passes a banner honoring health care workers in the window of a medical center in Boston. House Democrats are proposing hazard pay for front-line workers in a new relief bill. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., seen here in the Capitol on April 21, has led efforts to resume Senate business. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Despite Coronavirus Risks, The U.S. Senate Returns For Normal Business

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Mitch McConnell Insists On Liability Protections For Businesses During The Pandemic

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