Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

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Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, D-Pa., at a news conference in Philadelphia in 2019. Now that lawmakers have left for an extended recess amid the coronavirus pandemic, Scanlon hosted a kid's town hall over the phone. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, surrounded by a bipartisan group of members of the House, signs the CARES Act on March 27. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump signs the CARES act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office of the White House on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The $2 trillion relief plan that passed in the Senate on Wednesday night marks the largest rescue package in American history. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

After Days Of Negotiations, Deal Reached On Emergency Aid Measure

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on MSNBC Tuesday that after the coronavirus relief bill is passed, lawmakers will consider options for replacing in-person voting. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi arrives Monday to speak outside her office on Capitol Hill. The day was filled with back-and-forth in the Senate over the House Democrats' financial stimulus package. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

COVID-19 Updates: Federal Reserve Acts, Deal Eludes Congress, Trump Speaks

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In The Shadow Of Coronavirus, Members Of Congress Revisit Remote Voting

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