Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Claudia Grisales

Mike Morgan/NPR
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The U.S. Capitol has been hit by the coronavirus like the rest of the country, grappling with protective measures and multiple cases. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Vice President Pence speaks during a rally Friday in Canton, Ga., where he vowed: "We're going to keep fighting until every legal vote is counted. We're going to keep fighting until every illegal vote is thrown out." Ben Gray/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Gray/AP

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley speaks last month during a TV interview in the Russell Senate Office Building. He says he'll be working from home after testing positive for the virus. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Judy Shelton appears before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee in February. President Trump's nominee to the Federal Reserve has said she supports the gold standard and has questioned the mission of the central bank. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., a close ally of President Trump's, has been reelected as the top GOP leader for the next Congress after his party made unexpected gains in the November elections. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep.-elect Cori Bush, a Democrat from Missouri, arrives at a new member briefing at the Capitol on Friday. With the pandemic raging, the orientation bore little resemblance to previous sessions. But lawmakers will have access to coronavirus testing. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., center, is among the Republican lawmakers supporting a push for President-elect Joe Biden to receive new intelligence briefings as part of his transition to the White House. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Republicans Continue Backing Trump's Refusal To Concede The Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933548733/933548734" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Attorney General Bill Barr leaves the U.S. Capitol after meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Left: Republican Sen. David Perdue of Georgia speaks to reporters in 2019. Right: Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Jon Ossoff speaks at a rally at Morehouse College on Oct. 23, in Atlanta. Zach Gibson and Elijah Nouvelage/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zach Gibson and Elijah Nouvelage/AFP/Getty Images