Claudia Grisales Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter for NPR.
Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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Claudia Grisales

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Claudia Grisales, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Claudia Grisales

Congressional Reporter

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

Story Archive

Following the 2020 presidential election, then-Department of Justice official Jeffrey Clark promised to pursue baseless election fraud claims for then-President Donald Trump. Yuri Gripas/AP hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AP

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., (right), speaks to Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, following an April 29 news conference on the Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Act. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows at the U.S. Capitol in February. Meadows has agreed to provide documents and appear for a deposition before the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Ex-Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows will appear before the Jan. 6 panel

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Mark Meadows, Trump's last chief of staff, has missed multiple deadlines to appear before the Jan. 6 House panel. The committee chair said it could "force the Select Committee to consider pursuing contempt or other proceedings to enforce the subpoena." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Jan. 6 panel faces a different legal test to refer Mark Meadows for criminal contempt

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Pro-Trump protesters gather in front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in Washington, D.C. The mob stormed the Capitol, breaking windows and clashing with police officers. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Stone, left, and Alex Jones hold a press conference before attending a House Judiciary Committee hearing in 2018. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Stone, Alex Jones among new subpoenas issued by Jan. 6 panel

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Steve Bannon, Former Top Trump Aide, Charged With Contempt Of Congress

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More Trump Allies Ordered To Testify Before Congress About January 6th

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Former President Donald Trump arrives for a rally in Des Moines, Iowa, on Oct. 9. His effort to stop the release of records to a House panel investigating the Capitol riot earned a win on Thursday. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Then-President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Jan. 6, ahead of the riot at the Capitol. Trump is trying to stop the release of records to a House panel investigating the riot. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Trump appeals ruling that allows Jan. 6 panel to access Trump White House records

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn speaks during a protest of the outcome of the 2020 presidential election outside the Supreme Court in December 2020. Flynn has been subpoenaed by a select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jan. 6 panel issues new wave of subpoenas for ex-Trump officials

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