Cat Schuknecht
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Cat Schuknecht

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A memorial to the Rev. James Reeb, attacked near this site in 1965, stands in front of a faded civil rights mural in Selma, Ala. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

FBI Records Could Have Solved A Civil Rights Cold Case. Now It's Too Late

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William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home in Selma, Ala. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

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A magazine's cover line in Beijing asks, "How will Trump the businessman change the world?" on Dec. 28, 2016, days after then President-elect Donald Trump tapped outspoken China critic Peter Navarro for a top trade position. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Inside The White House's Bitter Fight Over China

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Top government leaders told NPR that federal agencies are years behind where they could have been if Chinese cybertheft had been openly addressed earlier. Bill Hinton Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Hinton Photography/Getty Images

As China Hacked, U.S. Businesses Turned A Blind Eye

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President Trump hands out pens after signing an executive order aimed at making it easier for companies to pursue oil and gas pipeline projects. The president addressed an audience at the International Union of Operating Engineers International Training and Education Center in Texas. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Some residents of the Israeli settlement Eli, shown here in 2016, have rented out properties there using Airbnb. David Vaaknin for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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David Vaaknin for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Election campaign billboards in Tel Aviv showing Israeli Prime Minister and head of the Likud party Benjamin Netanyahu (left), alongside the Blue and White alliance leaders Moshe Yaalon and Benny Gantz. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

Virginia's Kyle Guy celebrates after helping his team defeat Texas Tech in the NCAA championship tournament. The title game finished in overtime – a first since the University of Kansas beat the University of Memphis in 2008. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

On Friday, Big Cypress National Preserve announced in a post to Facebook that its team of researchers had discovered a 17-foot python, the largest one ever to be removed from the swamp. Big Cypress National Preserve/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Big Cypress National Preserve/Screenshot by NPR