Cat Schuknecht
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Cat Schuknecht

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At seventeen years old, Fred Clay was sentenced to prison for a crime he did not commit. Various flawed ideas in psychology were used to determine his guilt. Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson hide caption

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Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson

Hannah Groch-Begley listens to Dylan Matthews play the ukulele at their home in Washington, D.C. Dylan had hesitated to buy the ukulele because it felt like too big of an indulgence. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Bilal Chaudhry, 16, picks up a dozen eggs to give to a person in a car during a free egg distribution in Cumru Township, PA. The distribution was held to help people during the COVID-19 outbreak. MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Theory Vs. Reality: Why Our Economic Behavior Isn't Always Rational

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Volunteers for the grassroots network Columbia Community Care organize donated groceries and household items at one of five distribution sites in Howard County, Maryland. Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria hide caption

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Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria

This March 28, 2017, photo, provided by the New York State Sex Offender Registry, shows Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein died by apparent suicide while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. AP hide caption

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AP

The New York Times first reported last week that eight former Dalton students said the way Jeffrey Epstein interacted with teenage girls had stuck with them since high school. Last week, Epstein was charged with sex trafficking of minors. Patrick McMullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

A memorial to the Rev. James Reeb, attacked near this site in 1965, stands in front of a faded civil rights mural in Selma, Ala. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

FBI Records Could Have Solved A Civil Rights Cold Case. Now It's Too Late

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William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home in Selma, Ala. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

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