Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Soraya Nelson
Steve Barrett/N/A

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

International Correspondent, Berlin

International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

She was previously based in Cairo and covered the Arab World for NPR from the Middle East to North Africa. Nelson returns to Egypt on occasion to cover the tumultuous transition to democracy there.

In 2006, Nelson opened the NPR Kabul Bureau. During the following three and a half years, she gave listeners in an in-depth sense of life inside Afghanistan, from the increase in suicide among women in a country that treats them as second class citizens to the growing interference of Iran and Pakistan in Afghan affairs. For her coverage of Afghanistan, she won a Peabody Award, Overseas Press Club Award and the Gracie in 2010. She received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award from Colby College in 2011 for her coverage in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

Nelson spent 20 years as newspaper reporter, including as Knight Ridder's Middle East Bureau Chief. While at the Los Angeles Times, she was sent on extended assignment to Iran and Afghanistan following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. She spent three years an editor and reporter for Newsday and was part of the team that won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for covering the crash of TWA Flight 800.

A graduate of the University of Maryland, Nelson speaks Farsi, Dari and German.

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Story Archive

Putin (left) and Schroeder attend a test pipeline launch at a gas compressor station outside Vyborg, in western Russia, in September 2011. Alexei Nikolsky/AP Photo/RIA Novosti hide caption

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Schroeder Putin

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Hungary's prime minister Viktor Orban carries his ballot at a polling station in Budapest on Sunday, before winning a third consecutive term. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Hungarians Turn Out To Vote In Parliamentary Elections

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A protestor wearing a sticker reading "Relax, look deep into my eyes and vote us" takes part in a march by the Hungarian satirical Two-Tailed Dog Party in Budapest on March 15. Ferenc Isza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hungary's Anti-Migrant Prime Minister Leads Polls Before Elections

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Hungary's Prime Minister Embraces Far-Right Policies, May Reap Election Win

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14 European Countries Expelling Russian Diplomats In Response To Use Of Nerve Agent

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A memorial to slain journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée, Martina Kusnírová, has been set up in the lobby of Aktuality.sk. Since they were killed, the news site's office building has been guarded by the police and private security guards. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Slovakia Government's Collapse Not Enough To End Protests Over Journalist's Murder

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Slovaks Protest After Journalist's Killing

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People flash the lights of their mobile phones as they celebrate the resignation of Prime Minister Robert Fico and his government as a way out of the political crisis triggered by the killings of investigative journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée Martina Kusnírová, during a rally in Bratislava, Slovakia on Friday. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Slovakia's Government In Turmoil After Journalist's Death

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Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki (right) chose in January to visit Hungary's leader Viktor Orbán for his first international trip after taking office. Tamas Kovacs/AP hide caption

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How Poland And Hungary Are Forming A Powerful Tag Team Against Brussels

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