Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson Special correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and read at NPR.org.
Soraya Nelson
Stories By

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is a NPR foreign correspondent based in Cairo.

Egyptians Debate What New Decrees Will Mean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165854609/165854588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right) has given guarded support to Education Minister Annette Schavan, who is facing calls to resign over allegations of plagiarism. Thomas Peter/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Peter/Reuters /Landov

The main street in Oberhausen — Germany's most indebted city — is dotted with vacancies. Despite its economic woes, Oberhausen, like other western German cities, must make "reunification" payments to the former communist East. The payments help explain German voters' reluctance to bail out Greece and other eurozone countries. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Mohammed Naeem, a driver, holds up a framed photo of two relatives he says were killed by militant leader Abdullah near the western city of Herat. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

A money-changer in the Afghan city of Herat counts a stack of Iranian bills. More and more Iranian currency is being brought in by smugglers to exchange for dollars, which then go back to Iran. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

A U.S. soldier shares grapes with Afghan boys in the southern province of Kandahar on Wednesday. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Strains, U.S. Begins Wind-Down In Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161160883/161175563" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Afghan man inspects a motorcycle used in a suicide attack in a parking lot holding dozens of trucks supplying the NATO-run Kandahar Air Base in June. Bombings and assassinations are on the rise in Kandahar. Last month, a suicide bomber struck the convoy of the provincial police chief, Gen. Abdul Raziq, who was severely injured. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images