Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Though Usually Stoic, Merkel Shows Growing Ire With Russia

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What do you get when three Israelis, two Iranians and a German walk into a room? A Berlin-based world music ensemble known as Sistanagila, named after an Iranian province — Sistan and Baluchestan — and the popular Jewish folk song "Hava Nagila." Courtesy of Sistanagila hide caption

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Courtesy of Sistanagila

The Rare Place Where Israelis And Iranians Play Together

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People wait in line to cross the border from East to West Berlin one day after the collapse of the Berlin Wall at Friedriechstrasse railway station in Berlin, Germany, on Nov. 10, 1989. The station, known as the Palace of Tears, is now a museum. Michael Richter/DPA/Corbis hide caption

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Michael Richter/DPA/Corbis

Berlin's 'Palace Of Tears,' A Reminder Of Divided Families, Despair

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Art Installation Commemorates 25 Years Since Berlin Wall Lost Its Power

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The Berlin Wall fell on Nov. 9, 1989, 25 years ago this weekend. East Germans flooded into West Berlin after border guard Harald Jaeger ignored orders and opened the gate for the huge, unruly crowd. Alain Nogues/Sygma/Corbis hide caption

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Alain Nogues/Sygma/Corbis

The Man Who Disobeyed His Boss And Opened The Berlin Wall

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The entrance to the former concentration camp in Dachau, Germany, bears the Nazi slogan "Work Makes You Free." The gate was stolen over the weekend. Johannes Simon/Bongarts/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Simon/Bongarts/Getty Images

Germany Hopes Incentive Plan Will Strengthen Its Military

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Unusual Candidate Could Be The First Immigrant Mayor Of Berlin

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The broadcast tower at Alexanderplatz looms over the city center. A crossing point of tourists, commuters, shoppers, lovers, artists and bums, Alexanderplatz was rebuilt by the communist authorities of former East Germany in the 1960s. Today, it's a popular gathering place in the reunified city. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In Berlin, Remaking The City Can Rekindle Old Frictions

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Germany is the world's third-largest exporter of arms, like this bazooka destined for northern Iraq, being packed up at a German military base on Thursday. The country's economy minister has held up hundreds of weapons exports since he took office in December, angering many in the defense industry. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Germany's New Economy Minister Takes Aim At Arms Exports

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People with Israeli flags and banners attend a rally against anti-Semitism near the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on Sunday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Thousands Gather In Germany To Rally Against Anti-Semitism

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Additional EU Sanctions Target Russia's Actions In Ukraine

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Ukraine Announces Cease-Fire With Russia

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A man walks past burnt vehicles near a railway station after recent shelling in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, Aug. 29. Maxim Shemetov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Maxim Shemetov/Reuters/Landov

Despite Shelling, Ukrainian Workers Keep On Watering The Flowers

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