Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson Special correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and read at NPR.org.
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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is a NPR foreign correspondent based in Cairo.

Egypt Recalls Its Ambassador From Saudi Arabia

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Amr Moussa, the front-runner in the Egyptian presidential race, speaks during a press conference in Cairo on Apr. 22. The country's election commission said Thursday that Moussa and 12 other candidates are eligible to compete in next month's election. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

At Last, Egypt Settles On Presidential Candidates

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During a demonstration at Cairo's Tahrir Square last week, veiled Egyptian women hold posters supporting Muslim cleric Hazem Abu Ismail, an ultra-conservative preacher who was disqualified from running for the presidential elections on technical grounds. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Egyptian military police stand by as a protester holds a placard in support of Salafist presidential candidate Hazem Abu Ismail at a demonstration outside the High Presidential Election Committee building Tuesday in Cairo. Ismail and nine other candidates have been disqualified from the race. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

Egyptian Panel Bans 10 Presidential Candidates

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On March 24, Egyptians hold a poster with a photo of Belal Mamdouh, a teenager who was killed during clashes between soccer fans and Egyptian soldiers following the ban of the Port Said soccer team. AP hide caption

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AP

Egyptians protest outside the administrative court in the capital, Cairo, on Tuesday. The protesters are calling for the panel drafting the constitution to be made up entirely of non-parliamentarians. Controversy swirls around the 100-member panel — handpicked by Islamist lawmakers — which includes only a handful of women and Christians. Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images

Unease Grows Over Islamist Political Agenda In Egypt

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A Bedouin guide makes his way down from Mount Sinai to the Greek Orthodox monastery of St. Catherine in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. The Bedouins depend on tourism, but have been kidnapping visitors in recent months in an attempt to pressure Egypt's government. Mike Nelson/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Mike Nelson/EPA/Landov

The Egyptian national soccer team's American coach, Bob Bradley, attends his team's friendly match against Kenya in the Qatari capital, Doha, in February. The Egyptian team won 5-0. Karim Jaafar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Jaafar /AFP/Getty Images

Egyptian presidential candidate and former Arab League Secretary General Amr Moussa delivers a speech to Bedouins in Ras Sidr during a campaign trip to the South Sinai last week. Egyptians are anticipating the first presidential elections after last year's ouster of Hosni Mubarak. Asmaa Waguih/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Asmaa Waguih/Reuters/Landov

Egyptians Prepare For Wide-Open Presidential Poll

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A Coptic Christian man holds a cross made of flowers during a clash between Christians and Muslims in Cairo in November. Relations are becoming more strained between the two communities, and there has been periodic violence. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Khalil Hamra/AP

In Egypt, Christian-Muslim Tension Is On The Rise

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