Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson Special correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and read at NPR.org.
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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is a NPR foreign correspondent based in Cairo.

Paramedics and Afghan civilians carry a coffin containing the body of one of five people killed by a roadside bomb in Kandahar in mid-April. Fear has gripped the southern city of Kandahar ahead of NATO's upcoming offensive. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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Allauddin Khan/AP

Violence Drains Hope From Afghans In Kandahar

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Afghans walk by a house destroyed in a suicide bombing the previous night in Kandahar last month. Fear has gripped the southern city ahead of an upcoming U.S. offensive, as Taliban militants flood into the area in preparation. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghans Want Karzai's U.S. Trip To Be Fruitful

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Afghan motorists pass a U.S. soldier on patrol last month in Afghanistan's southern Kandahar province. U.S. and Canadian forces have announced a major upcoming offensive against the Taliban in Kandahar, the group's stronghold and spiritual birthplace. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Gulbuddin Hekmatyar (shown here in Iran in 2001), leader of the militant Hizb-i-Islami group, has recently made peace overtures to Afghan President Hamid Karzai. But observers are unsure about his motives. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Afghanistan's President: Partner Or Obstacle?

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Karzai Holds Talks With Rebel Group

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An illegal crop of poppies stands out from a newly harvested crop of wheat in Afghanistan. The opium trade is a key source of income for the Taliban. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

Commandos Crack Down On Afghan Drug Trade

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Ahmadeinejad Denounces U.S. In Afghanistan

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An Afghan security officer tries to stop photographers from taking pictures outside The Park Residence guesthouse at the site of a gun battle in the Shar-e Naw district in Kabul on Feb. 26. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Sally, a bomb-sniffing dog, assists Marines in the search for IEDs during their offensive in Marjah, a Taliban-infested area of southern Afghanistan. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Taliban Flees Marjah, Threat Remains For Marines

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