Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson Special correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and read at NPR.org.
Soraya Nelson
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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is a NPR foreign correspondent based in Cairo.

Graft-Fighting Afghan Prosecutor Forced To Retire

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Muslim Egyptian men pray during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan at Cairo's historic Al-Azhar mosque in September 2009. Some experts say many Egyptians have lost the meaning of the holy month, spending too much time after hours partying, eating and watching TV. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images) hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images)

Ahmed Abdel Aziz sings the call to prayer, or the azan, at Al- Maghfara Mosque in a suburb of Cairo last month. Holly Pickett for NPR hide caption

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Holly Pickett for NPR

Egyptian Trial Sheds Light On Police Brutality

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In Egypt, Rare Police Brutality Trial Draws Scrutiny

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Suicide Bomber Strikes Afghan Wedding

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An Afghan policeman stands in front of a banner Monday advertising this week's gathering of Afghan tribal leaders in Kabul. The 1,600 delegates at the much-delayed and much-touted gathering will debate strategies for convincing the Taliban and other insurgents to lay down their arms. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Paramedics and Afghan civilians carry a coffin containing the body of one of five people killed by a roadside bomb in Kandahar in mid-April. Fear has gripped the southern city of Kandahar ahead of NATO's upcoming offensive. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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Allauddin Khan/AP

Violence Drains Hope From Afghans In Kandahar

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Afghans walk by a house destroyed in a suicide bombing the previous night in Kandahar last month. Fear has gripped the southern city ahead of an upcoming U.S. offensive, as Taliban militants flood into the area in preparation. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP