Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Soraya Nelson
Steve Barrett/N/A

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

International Correspondent, Berlin

International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

She was previously based in Cairo and covered the Arab World for NPR from the Middle East to North Africa. Nelson returns to Egypt on occasion to cover the tumultuous transition to democracy there.

In 2006, Nelson opened the NPR Kabul Bureau. During the following three and a half years, she gave listeners in an in-depth sense of life inside Afghanistan, from the increase in suicide among women in a country that treats them as second class citizens to the growing interference of Iran and Pakistan in Afghan affairs. For her coverage of Afghanistan, she won a Peabody Award, Overseas Press Club Award and the Gracie in 2010. She received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award from Colby College in 2011 for her coverage in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

Nelson spent 20 years as newspaper reporter, including as Knight Ridder's Middle East Bureau Chief. While at the Los Angeles Times, she was sent on extended assignment to Iran and Afghanistan following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. She spent three years an editor and reporter for Newsday and was part of the team that won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for covering the crash of TWA Flight 800.

A graduate of the University of Maryland, Nelson speaks Farsi, Dari and German.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel's Coalition Talks Have Failed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565506350/565506351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coalition Talks In Germany Collapse, Blow To Merkel's Leadership

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565288705/565288706" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at her Berlin party headquarters Friday for talks with members of potential coalition parties to form a new government. Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images

Germany's Merkel, Weakened After Poor Election Showing, Struggles To Form Government

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564668822/565026228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German Consumers Fight Automakers For Compensation In Emissions Scandal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563378729/563378730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anas Modamani speaks to the media Feb. 6 in Wuerzburg, Germany, after a court session about his lawsuit against Facebook. Modamani's suit, regarding the misuse of a selfie he took of himself with German Chancellor Angela Merkel was rejected, but his lawyer Lawyer Chan-Jo Jun, right, says that under a new law a lawsuit might not even have been necessary. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

With Huge Fines, German Law Pushes Social Networks To Delete Abusive Posts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561024666/561063732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

500 Years Since 95 Theses, Martin Luther's Legacy Divides Some Of His Descendants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559215320/559215321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Coalition Talks, Kurz Expected To Be Austria's Next Prime Minister

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557985831/557985832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Far-Right Expected To Win Austrian Elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557933974/557933975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sebastian Kurz, Austria's foreign minister and leader of the conservative Austrian People's Party (OeVP), arrives at his party headquarters on Oct. 13 in Vienna. The OeVP is currently leading in polls. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Austria Election: Center-Right Party Head Likely Next Prime Minister

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557580074/557863744" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Germany's Angela Merkel Wins 4th Term As Far-Right Party Gains Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553532563/553532564" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German Chancellor and Christian Democrat Angela Merkel appears to have lost some support because of her refugee policy that allowed more than a million asylum seekers into the country since 2015. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Deportation As An Election Issue In Germany

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553115093/553115094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript