Reynaldo Leaños Jr.
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Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

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Amid U.S. Lockdowns, The Border Wall Construction Goes On

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For five generations Nayda Alvarez's family has owned property along the Rio Grande near Rio Grande City, Texas. Alvarez says that if the border wall were built as laid out in preliminary maps, her house would end up about a yard away from it. This could mean that her house would have to be demolished in order to leave the 150-foot enforcement zone clear for surveillance. Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio

Central American migrants, sent from the United States, walk out in the streets of Guatemala City after arriving at the airport on Feb. 13, 2020. When asylum-seekers land in Guatemala, they are processed by immigration and asked if they want to stay in Guatemala or return to their countries. They are given 72 hours to decide. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Asylum-Seekers Reaching U.S. Border Are Being Flown To Guatemala

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Worries Over Migrants' Mental Health

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Drying migrants clothes in an encampment near the Gateway International Bridge in Matamoros, Tamaulipas. More than 1,500 asylum-seekers are living in the tent encampment. Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

Mexican Official Tries To Move Asylum-Seekers Stuck In Tent Camps

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Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro walked with a group of asylum-seekers and their lawyers from Mexico to Texas on Monday. Hours later, CBP released the asylum-seekers back into Mexico. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Pedestrians on the Puerta Mexico bridge, which crosses the Rio Grande, wait to enter Brownsville, Texas, at a legal port of entry in Matamoros, Mexico, in August. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Pregnant Women Among Asylum Seekers Sent To Mexico To Wait For Immigration Court

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On a recent day, the sidewalk school in Matamoros, Mexico, began with arts and crafts. Reynaldo Leaños Jr. /Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leaños Jr. /Texas Public Radio

Sidewalk School Aims To Give Migrant Kids A Sense Of Stability

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In Mexican Border Town, A Pop-Up School For Migrant Children

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How Constantly Changing Immigration Policies Affect Migrants Already In Danger

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A youth stands Sunday by the border fence that separates Mexico from the U.S., where candles and crosses stand in memory of the father and daughter who died during their journey toward the U.S. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Border Community Remembers A Father And Daughter Who Drowned Crossing The Rio Grande

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U.S. Border Patrol agents found four bodies near the Rio Grande river along Anzalduas Park, close to McAllen, Texas. In this file photo, a Border Patrol boat is seen on the river along Anzalduas Park. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

As More Migrants Cross Rio Grande, Border Patrol Rescues Surge

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