Reynaldo Leaños Jr.
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Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

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Saturday

Friday

For five generations Nayda Alvarez's family has owned property along the Rio Grande near Rio Grande City, Texas. Alvarez says that if the border wall were built as laid out in preliminary maps, her house would end up about a yard away from it. This could mean that her house would have to be demolished in order to leave the 150-foot enforcement zone clear for surveillance. Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio

Wednesday

Central American migrants, sent from the United States, walk out in the streets of Guatemala City after arriving at the airport on Feb. 13, 2020. When asylum-seekers land in Guatemala, they are processed by immigration and asked if they want to stay in Guatemala or return to their countries. They are given 72 hours to decide. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Asylum-Seekers Reaching U.S. Border Are Being Flown To Guatemala

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Sunday

Worries Over Migrants' Mental Health

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Saturday

Drying migrants clothes in an encampment near the Gateway International Bridge in Matamoros, Tamaulipas. More than 1,500 asylum-seekers are living in the tent encampment. Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

Mexican Official Tries To Move Asylum-Seekers Stuck In Tent Camps

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Tuesday

Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro walked with a group of asylum-seekers and their lawyers from Mexico to Texas on Monday. Hours later, CBP released the asylum-seekers back into Mexico. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Saturday

Pedestrians on the Puerta Mexico bridge, which crosses the Rio Grande, wait to enter Brownsville, Texas, at a legal port of entry in Matamoros, Mexico, in August. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Friday

Pregnant Women Among Asylum Seekers Sent To Mexico To Wait For Immigration Court

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Saturday

On a recent day, the sidewalk school in Matamoros, Mexico, began with arts and crafts. Reynaldo Leaños Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leaños Jr./Texas Public Radio

Friday

In Mexican Border Town, A Pop-Up School For Migrant Children

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Saturday

How Constantly Changing Immigration Policies Affect Migrants Already In Danger

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Monday

A youth stands Sunday by the border fence that separates Mexico from the U.S., where candles and crosses stand in memory of the father and daughter who died during their journey toward the U.S. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Border Community Remembers A Father And Daughter Who Drowned Crossing The Rio Grande

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Monday

U.S. Border Patrol agents found four bodies near the Rio Grande river along Anzalduas Park, close to McAllen, Texas. In this file photo, a Border Patrol boat is seen on the river along Anzalduas Park. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Saturday

As More Migrants Cross Rio Grande, Border Patrol Rescues Surge

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Saturday

Traffic backs up along the route to the border crossing from Mexico to the U.S. in Laredo, Texas in 2015. Mexico recently surpassed China and Canada as America's top trading partner, which helped catapult Laredo past Los Angeles to become the number one port in the country. Matthew Busch/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/Getty Images

Laredo, Texas, Now No. 1 U.S. Trade Hub, Braces For Trump's Mexico Tariffs

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Friday

U.S. Builds Two $37 Million Temporary Holding Tents For Migrants

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The new tent facility in Donna, Texas, is divided into four color-coded "detention pods." There is a separate intake and processing area. Reynaldo Leaños Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leaños Jr./Texas Public Radio

Thursday

Rancher Hugh Fitzsimons stands next to a pile of debris migrants left behind once they crossed into the United States. Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio

Sunday

Good Neighbor Settlement House in Brownsville, Texas, is helping recently released migrants by offering them a meal, shower and some new clothes before journeying up north to await their day in immigration court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Shelters And City Governments Scramble To Help Migrants In The Rio Grande Valley

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Tuesday

Eloisa Tamez of El Calaboz, Texas, walks along the border wall in her backyard. She took the government to court over surveying her land and over the compensation she received for the land needed for border wall construction. Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio

Rio Grande Valley Landowners Plan To Fight Border Wall Expansion

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Tuesday

Friday

Gracie Garcia poses for a photo in her backyard in Los Indios, near San Benito, Texas. The border wall was built about 10 years ago on Garcia's property, and she says she has not been paid for it. Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio

In The Rio Grande Valley, Residents Prepare For Construction Of A New Border Wall

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Thursday

On Thursday ICE officials confirmed at least six immigrant detainees on a hunger strike are being force-fed through a nasal tube. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images