Tom Huizenga Tom Huizenga is a music producer for NPR Digital Media.
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Tom Huizenga

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Tom Huizenga
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Tom Huizenga

Music Producer

Tom Huizenga is a music producer, reporter, and blogger for NPR Music.

He is a regular contributor of stories about classical music to NPR's news programs and hosts NPR's classical music blog Deceptive Cadence. He is the classical music reviewer for All Things Considered.

Joining NPR in 1999, Huizenga spent seven years as a producer, writer, and editor for NPR's Peabody Award-winning daily classical music show Performance Today and for the programs SymphonyCast and World of Opera.

He's produced live concerts, including a radio broadcast of Gershwin's Porgy & Bess from Washington National Opera at the Kennedy Center and NPR's first classical music webcast from New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge, featuring the Emerson String Quartet. He's also produced videos of musicians playing in unlikely venues, such as mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato singing at the historic Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village and cellist Alisa Weilerstein at the Baltimore Aquarium. He's written and produced radio specials, like A Choral Christmas With Stile Antico, broadcast on stations around the country.

Huizenga's radio career began at the University of Michigan, where he hosted opera, jazz, free-form, and experimental radio programs at Ann Arbor's WCBN. As a student in the Ethnomusicology department, Huizenga studied and performed traditional court music from Indonesia. He also studied English Literature and voice, while writing for the university's newspaper.

Huizenga took his love of music and broadcasting to New Mexico, where he served as music director for NPR member station KRWG, in Las Cruces, and taught radio production at New Mexico State University.

In his spare time, Huizenga writes about music for the Washington Post and overloads on concerts and movies.

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Soul singer Aretha Franklin poses for a portrait in 1964. Michael Ochs Archives/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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In Memoriam 2018: The Musicians We Lost

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The Cleveland Orchestra, with its music director Franz Welser-Möst, at Severance Hall, the orchestra's home since 1931. Roger Mastroianni/Courtesy of The Cleveland Orchestra hide caption

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U.S. Navy CPO Graham Jackson, with tears of grief, plays "Goin' Home," from Dvorak's 'New World' Symphony, as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's body is carried from Warm Springs, Ga., where he died. Ed Clark/Life Picture Collection/Getty hide caption

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Matthew Aucoin, 28, has been awarded a MacArthur "genius" grant for his work as a composer and conductor. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Our solar system is the subject of composer Gustav Holst's The Planets, which premiered 100 years ago on Sept. 29, 1918. NASA/Wikimedia commons hide caption

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'The Planets' At 100: A Listener's Guide To Holst's Solar System

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Magos Hererra's new album, Dreamers, with the string quartet and Brooklyn Rider, is steeped in Latin American culture. Shervin Lainez/Sony Music hide caption

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Erasing Genres En Español: A Smoky-Voiced Jazz Singer Meets Classical Strings

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