Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a correspondent at NPR, covering how misleading narratives and false claims circulate online and offline, and their impact on society and democracy.
Shannon Bond
Stories By

Shannon Bond

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a correspondent at NPR, covering how misleading narratives and false claims circulate online and offline, and their impact on society and democracy.

She previously covered technology for NPR's Business desk, focused on how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Lindsay Lohan and other celebrities were tricked into calling for the ouster of Moldova's president through videos requested on the Cameo app that were edited and posted on TikTok. TikTok/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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TikTok/Screenshot by NPR

Cameo is being used for political propaganda — by tricking the stars involved

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Friday

A voter leaves a polling booth at St. Anthony Community Center in Manchester, N.H., during the state's presidential primary on Jan. 23. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Tech giants pledge action against deceptive AI in elections

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Thursday

Voters wait to cast their ballots on Jan. 23 in Loudon, N.H. Shortly before voting began, some voters in the state got calls from a faked version of President Biden's voice urging them not to vote, a sign of the potential that deepfakes could have on the electoral process. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

AI fakes raise election risks as lawmakers and tech companies scramble to catch up

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Tuesday

Meta, the owner of Instagram and Facebook, will start labeling images created with leading artificial intelligence tools in the coming months, amid growing worries about the potential for AI to mislead. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

Taylor Swift waves after the AFC Championship NFL football game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2024, in Baltimore. Nick Wass/AP hide caption

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Nick Wass/AP

Thursday

Travis Kelce of the Kansas City Chiefs celebrates with Taylor Swift after a 17-10 victory against the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC Championship Game on Jan. 28, 2024 in Baltimore. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Here's why conspiracy theories about Taylor Swift and the Super Bowl are spreading

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Friday

Elections for many national governments and the European Parliament, seen here in Brussels in 2020, will take place in 2024. Experts warn that these elections are ripe targets for bad actors seeking to disrupt democracy. Thierry Roge/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

2024 elections are ripe targets for foes of democracy

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Wednesday

Worldwide, 2024 elections are a target for bad actors trying to disrupt democracy

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Wednesday

A supporter of Kuomintang, or KMT, Taiwan's major opposition party, waves Taiwan's national flag on Nov. 24, 2023, in Taipei, Taiwan. Researchers uncovered an influence operation targeting Taiwan's upcoming presidential election on Facebook, TikTok and YouTube. Annabelle Chih/Getty Images hide caption

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Annabelle Chih/Getty Images

Monday

Disinformation researcher Joan Donovan testifying remotely during a U.S. Senate hearing in April 2021. Donovan contends she lost her job at Harvard University due to pressure from the social media company, Meta. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Thursday

Meta, the social media company that owns Facebook and Instagram, said Thursday that this year it has taken down five networks of fake accounts originating in China that aimed to influence politics in other countries. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Monday

This picture taken from a position in southern Israel near the border with the Gaza Strip shows smoke billowing in the the Palestinian territory after an Israeli strike on November 21, 2023, amid ongoing battles between Israel and the Palestinian Hamas movement. John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images

Civilian deaths are being dismissed as 'crisis actors' in Gaza and Israel

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Friday

Did a letter written by Osama bin Laden really go viral on TikTok this week?

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Tuesday

A photo shows the logo signs of Google and YouTube at their stand ahead of the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos in 2022. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Voters fill out their ballots at the U.S. Air Force MEPS Liaison building on November 07, 2023 in Jackson, Mississippi. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Why Is It Getting Harder To Fight Election Misinformation?

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Friday

A voter fills out a ballot in Jackson, Miss., on Tuesday. Federal and local officials have worked closely with researchers to track rumors and conspiracy theories in recent elections but that cooperation is fading under pressure from conservatives. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Why the fight to counter false election claims may be harder in 2024

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Thursday

An aerial view of the complex housing the Ahli Arab hospital in Gaza City after an explosion on the hospital grounds that killed hundreds, according to Palestinian officials. Unraveling the facts behind the explosion has been made difficult because of swarms of social media accounts spreading false information about the explosion. Shadi Al-Tabatibi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Shadi Al-Tabatibi/AFP via Getty Images

Fake accounts, old videos and rumors fuel chaos around Gaza hospital explosion

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Shortly after a Gaza hospital was hit, disinformation spread across social media

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Tuesday

Israeli troop reinforcements take position at the border with Gaza in southern Israel on Monday. Social media and messaging apps have been flooded with false and out of context images since fighting started this weekend. Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images

Video game clips and old videos are flooding social media about Israel and Gaza

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Monday

Detangling the online disinformation about the war between Israel and Hamas

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Friday

An American flag flies on top of the White House, Feb. 12, 2022, in Washington. A federal appeals court Friday, Sept. 8, 2023, significantly whittled down a lower court's order curbing Biden administration communications with social media companies over controversial content about COVID-19 and other issues. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Tuesday

Facebook's parent company, Meta, says operations linked to China and Russia used fake accounts across social media sites to spread messages Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Meta says Chinese, Russian influence operations are among the biggest it's taken down

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Tuesday

How easy is it to make the AI behind chatbots go rogue? Hackers at Defcon test it out

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