Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

Story Archive

Meta has removed six networks of accounts for abusing its platforms, underscoring the ways bad actors around the world use social media as a tool to promote false information and harass opponents. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Parag Agrawal, a software engineer known to few outside Twitter, has replaced Jack Dorsey as CEO. Twitter hide caption

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Twitter

Meet Parag Agrawal, Twitter's new CEO

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Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal succeeds Jack Dorsey as the company's CEO

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Jack Dorsey is stepping down as the CEO of Twitter, which he co-founded. Here he's shown at a bitcoin convention in June. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO; Parag Agrawal succeeds him

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Delegates attend the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

These researchers are trying to stop misinformation from derailing climate progress

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Facebook will no longer let advertisers target people with ads based on how interested the social network thinks they are in topics like politics, religion, or race. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Facebook changes company name to Meta as it shifts focus to building its 'metaverse'

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote address during a virtual event on Oct. 28. Zuckerberg announced that Facebook will rebrand itself under a new name: Meta. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Facebook is rebranding as Meta — but the app you use will still be called Facebook

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Youtube, Snapchat and TikTok officials testify to Senators on kids' online safety

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The Facebook Papers Show How Quickly Radicalization Can Happen Online

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How the 'Stop the Steal' movement outwitted Facebook ahead of the Jan. 6 riot

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A protester unleashes a smoke grenade in front of the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How the 'Stop the Steal' movement outwitted Facebook ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection

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