Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

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Story Archive

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing about how social media companies handled election misinformation. Hannah McKay-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah McKay-Pool/Getty Images

Facebook And Twitter Defend Election Policies To Skeptical Senators

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Facebook And Twitter CEOs Face Questions On Content Moderation

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Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo has been urging followers of her Twitter feed to join her on the social media app Parler. Brandon Wade/AP hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP

Conservatives Flock To Mercer-Funded Parler, Claim Censorship On Facebook And Twitter

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Twitter hid some tweets, including many from President Donald Trump, behind labels warning users they contained disputed or misleading information about the election. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Millie Weaver, a former correspondent for the conspiracy theory website Infowars, hosts nearly 7 hours of live coverage on her YouTube channel. Conservative influencers like Weaver who often broadcast live are increasingly worrisome to misinformation researchers. YouTube hide caption

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From Steve Bannon To Millennial Millie: Facebook, YouTube Struggle With Live Video

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Livestreams Undermine Social Media Platforms' Efforts To Fight Misinformation

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Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon has been penalized by Facebook and YouTube, and suspended from Twitter, for his activity on social media. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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People call for stopping Pennsylvania's vote count Thursday at the state Capitol in Harrisburg. False claims of voter fraud and calls to protest have spread on social media, leading Facebook to take down one large group. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A California ballot measure over whether Uber and Lyft should treat their drivers as employees divided gig workers but was approved by voters. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

California Voters Give Uber, Lyft A Win But Some Drivers Aren't So Sure

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Uber And Lyft To Continue Treating Drivers As Independent Contractors

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Black Lives Matter protesters display wristbands reading "I Voted" after leaving a polling place this month in Louisville, Ky. Activists warn Black and Latino voters are being flooded with disinformation intended to suppress turnout in the election's final days. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Black And Latino Voters Flooded With Disinformation In Election's Final Days

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Black And Latino Voters Flooded With Disinformation In Final Days Before Election

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