Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
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Senators pressed Google executive Donald Harrison over whether the tech giant wields too much power over advertisers and publishers in the digital ad market, amid widening scrutiny of the company's dominance. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Twitter says it will crack down on attempts to undermine faith in the November election or incite unrest. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Matt Nowling, a senior at Denison University and interim president of College Democrats of America, is one of many campus activists adjusting to virtual organizing during the pandemic. Shelby Tour hide caption

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Shelby Tour

College Political Activists Trade Door-Knocking For Apps To Register Voters

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Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

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An appeals court has given Uber and Lyft more time to fight a judge's order over how they classify their drivers, averting a threatened shutdown in California. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Federal prosecutors allege Uber's former head of security organized a cover-up of a massive data breach. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former Uber Executive Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Massive Breach

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Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

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Alleged hackers under the names of Rolex#0373 and Kirk#5270 allegedly discuss the possibility of selling access to hacked Twitter accounts for up to $2,500. U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California

Florida 17-Year-Old, 'Mastermind' Of Twitter Hack, And Two Others Face Charges

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Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, speaks during a House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust on Capitol Hill. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

4 Key Takeaways From Washington's Big Tech Hearing On 'Monopoly Power'

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