Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
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Civil rights groups and other critics say the social network has not done enough to curb misinformation, hate speech and voter suppression ahead of the U.S. presidential election. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

A screenshot of an Instagram post Facebook linked to Russia's Internet Research Agency. United World International was a phony website created by the Russian operation and promoted on social media. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Attorney General William Barr and President Donald Trump want to pare back longstanding legal protections for Internet platforms. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Buildings are engulfed in flames as a wildfire ravages Talent, Ore., on Sept. 8, 2020. Unfounded rumors that left-wing activists were behind the fires went viral on social media, thanks to amplification by conspiracy theorists and the platforms' own design. Kevin Jantzer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Jantzer/AP

Can Circuit Breakers Stop Viral Rumors On Facebook, Twitter?

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Facebook says the fake accounts it removed focused mainly on Southeast Asia. But they also included some content about the U.S. election, which did not gain a large following. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Social Media Do To Slow Down The Spread Of Misinformation?

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Senators pressed Google executive Donald Harrison over whether the tech giant wields too much power over advertisers and publishers in the digital ad market, amid widening scrutiny of the company's dominance. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Twitter says it will crack down on attempts to undermine faith in the November election or incite unrest. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Matt Nowling, a senior at Denison University and interim president of College Democrats of America, is one of many campus activists adjusting to virtual organizing during the pandemic. Shelby Tour hide caption

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Shelby Tour

College Political Activists Trade Door-Knocking For Apps To Register Voters

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Former Uber Security Chief Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Data Breach

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An appeals court has given Uber and Lyft more time to fight a judge's order over how they classify their drivers, averting a threatened shutdown in California. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Federal prosecutors allege Uber's former head of security organized a cover-up of a massive data breach. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former Uber Executive Charged With Paying 'Hush Money' To Conceal Massive Breach

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