Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

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Story Archive

Stanford-Educated Software Engineer Develops App To Combat Online Abuse

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Software engineer Tracy Chou's own experience on social media led her to create Block Party, an app that helps people filter their feeds to manage online abuse and harassment. Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR

Block Party Aims To Be A 'Spam Folder' For Social Media Harassment

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Facebook rescinded its ban on the sharing of news stories in Australia after the government amended proposed laws that will require social media companies to pay news publishers for sharing or using content on their platforms. Robert Cianflone/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Facebook Blocks News Content From Australia

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Demonstrators in New Delhi shout slogans during a protest against the arrest of climate change activist Disha Ravi for allegedly helping to create a guide for anti-government farmers protests. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter In Standoff With India's Government Over Free Speech And Local Law

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Facebook Takes A Hard Line Against Proposed Australian Law

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Behind Twitter's Tricky Balancing Act In India

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Twitter's new pilot program Birdwatch aims to enlist the social network's users to fact check each other's tweets. Twitter/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Twitter/Screenshot by NPR

Twitter's 'Birdwatch' Aims to Crowdsource Fight Against Misinformation

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Twitter Effort To Quell Misinformation Calls On Users To Fact-Check Tweets

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A healthcare worker administers a dose of the coronavirus vaccine to an elderly at a health center in the Cypriot coastal city of Limassol on February 8, 2021. Iakovos Hatzistavrou/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Iakovos Hatzistavrou/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos delivers the keynote address at the Air Force Association's Annual Air in 2018. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Jeff Bezos To Step Down As Amazon's CEO

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With social media platforms cracking down on the baseless QAnon conspiracy theory, adherents are scrambling to find other ways to communicate. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Unwelcome On Facebook And Twitter, QAnon Followers Flock To Fringe Sites

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Where Have QAnon Supporters Gone?

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Facebook created the panel of experts to review the hardest calls the social network makes about what it does and does not allow users to post. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

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Alternative Social Media Platforms Become Popular Among Some Trump Supporters

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