Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

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Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

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Alleged hackers under the names of Rolex#0373 and Kirk#5270 allegedly discuss the possibility of selling access to hacked Twitter accounts for up to $2,500. U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California

Florida 17-Year-Old, 'Mastermind' Of Twitter Hack, And Two Others Face Charges

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Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, speaks during a House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust on Capitol Hill. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

4 Key Takeaways From Washington's Big Tech Hearing On 'Monopoly Power'

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies Wednesday via video before the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee. The hearing also featured the heads of Apple, Facebook and Google. Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Heads Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google Testify On Big Tech's Power

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Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP

Big Tech In Washington's Hot Seat: What You Need To Know

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The civil rights experts Facebook hired to review its policies faulted CEO Mark Zuckerberg's decision to prioritize free speech over other values. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

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Food delivery has been a bright spot for Uber during the coronavirus pandemic, as people stuck at home are ordering out more. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Uber Gobbles Up Postmates In $2.65 Billion Bet On Food Delivery

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Uber Agrees To Acquire Postmates For $2.65 Billion

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Rashad Robinson is president of Color of Change, one of the groups organizing an advertising boycott of Facebook for the month of July. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Over 400 Advertisers Hit Pause On Facebook, Threatening $70 Billion Juggernaut

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