Shannon Bond Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.
Shannon Bond
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Shannon Bond

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Shannon Bond
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Shannon Bond

Tech Correspondent

Shannon Bond is a business correspondent at NPR, covering technology and how Silicon Valley's biggest companies are transforming how we live, work and communicate.

Bond joined NPR in September 2019. She previously spent 11 years as a reporter and editor at the Financial Times in New York and San Francisco. At the FT, she covered subjects ranging from the media, beverage and tobacco industries to the Occupy Wall Street protests, student debt, New York City politics and emerging markets. She also co-hosted the FT's award-winning podcast, Alphachat, about business and economics.

Bond has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School and a bachelor's degree in psychology and religion from Columbia University. She grew up in Washington, D.C., but is enjoying life as a transplant to the West Coast.

Story Archive

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) is co-sponsoring a bill that seeks to hold social media platforms responsible for the proliferation of health misinformation during a public health emergency. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump has announced that he is suing three of the country's biggest tech companies: Facebook, Twitter and Google's YouTube. Here, he walks onstage during a rally on July 3 in Sarasota, Fla. Jason Behnken/AP hide caption

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Jason Behnken/AP

Donald Trump Sues Facebook, YouTube And Twitter For Alleged Censorship

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Federal Trade Commission chair Lina Khan is one of the most prominent progressive voices calling for more aggressive curbs on the dominance of big companies. Saul Loeb/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing on October 28, 2020. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook Gets Reprieve As Court Throws Out Major Antitrust Complaints

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Social Audio Began As A Pandemic Fad. Tech Companies See It As The Future

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The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a standoff with social media companies over what content gets investigated or blocked online, and who gets to decide. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

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Bikas Das/AP

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

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India Demands Social Media Firms Help It Track Misinformation Online

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Facebook Suspends President Trump For 2 Years, Changes Rules For Politicians

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Facebook says former President Donald Trump cannot use its social media platforms until at least Jan. 7, 2023. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Suspended From Facebook For 2 Years

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Democratic senators, led by Cory Booker of New Jersey, say they worry about how Google's products and policies may perpetuate bias. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Parents and tech companies are both struggling with how to handle underage kids using social media apps. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Parents To Facebook: Don't Make A Kid-Only Instagram, Just A Better Instagram

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Parents Say There Doesn't Need To Be A Kid-Only Instagram, Just A Kid-Friendlier One

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The majority of anti-vaccine claims on social media trace back to a small number of influential figures, according to researchers. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Just 12 People Are Behind Most Vaccine Hoaxes On Social Media, Research Shows

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